Fears Rise in Nigeria as Opposition Leader Moves to Challenge Election Results

Torn posters of Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari in Abuja, Nigeria, Feb. 24, 2019 (AP photo by Jerome Delay).
Torn posters of Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari in Abuja, Nigeria, Feb. 24, 2019 (AP photo by Jerome Delay).
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LAGOS, Nigeria—The last time a leader of an opposition party in Nigeria rejected the results of the country’s presidential election, nearly eight years ago, hundreds of people were killed and tens of thousands displaced in the ensuing violence. Now there are fears of a similar scenario unfolding as Atiku Abubakar, a former vice president long tainted by corruption allegations, heads to court to challenge the outcome of the Feb. 23 election that President Muhammadu Buhari easily won. Atiku, as Abubakar is widely known in Nigeria, lost by nearly 4 million votes, with 11,262,978 against Buhari’s 15,191,847. He and his supporters […]

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