EU Sets Pace With Ambitious Emissions, Clean Energy Targets

Frimmersdorf Power Station, Grevenbroich, Germany, Jan. 16, 2012 (photo by Flickr user Bert Kaufmann licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license).
Frimmersdorf Power Station, Grevenbroich, Germany, Jan. 16, 2012 (photo by Flickr user Bert Kaufmann licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license).

With the next stage of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) process set for November and December of this year in Paris, there has been a recent flurry of political and diplomatic activity from the European Union and its 28 member-states regarding their plans for reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Their pledges have come alongside ambitious designs for future joint electricity generation continent-wide, given geopolitical tensions with Russia, which remains “Europe’s largest single foreign supplier of not only gas, but also oil, coal and nuclear fuel.” While there are still critical challenges to realizing the milestones set down […]

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