El Niño Tests Latin America’s Ability to Adapt to Climate Risks

A man rows his boat through a flooded street in Concordia, Argentina, Dec. 28, 2015 (AP photo by Natacha Pisarenko).
A man rows his boat through a flooded street in Concordia, Argentina, Dec. 28, 2015 (AP photo by Natacha Pisarenko).

The global weather event known as El Niño has been blamed for droughts in Central America and northern South America and record-breaking floods in Argentina, Brazil and Paraguay. But some scientists warn that the worst could be yet to come. El Niño poses major challenges for Latin America’s governments, some of which are in the midst of economic and political crises. The weather phenomenon is also testing their ability to face the growing threat of climate change, now and in the future. Scientists believe that El Niño, a warming of the central and eastern Pacific Ocean about once every decade […]

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