Economic Crisis Underlines Need for U.S. National Security Reform

Economic Crisis Underlines Need for U.S. National Security Reform

As the IMF and the Joint World Bank-IMF Development Committee meet in Washington this weekend, they will undoubtedly be discussing what most Americans are only dimly aware of: The recession is a global national security problem. The American people must understand that the economic crisis will be manifested not only in lost jobs and incomes -- it will be felt in enhanced dangers to U.S. national security and homeland security.

In February, Director of National Intelligence Adm. Dennis C. Blair told the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence the top national security threat facing the U.S. is the economic crisis. "Besides increased economic nationalism, the most likely political fallout for U.S. interests will involve allies and friends not being able to fully meet their defense and
humanitarian obligations," Blair said.

Iraq is one such unstable ally. The global economic crisis is beginning to severely affect Iraq's reconstruction. The primary sources of the country's money -- oil revenues and American financial support -- have both plummeted. As a result, Iraq is less able to rebuild and meet its basic defense needs.

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