Does Any Party in South Sudan Have the Will to Prevent Genocide?

Students outside a classroom with a map of Africa on its wall, Yei, southern South Suda, Nov. 15, 2016 (AP photo by Justin Lynch).
Students outside a classroom with a map of Africa on its wall, Yei, southern South Suda, Nov. 15, 2016 (AP photo by Justin Lynch).

The third anniversary last week of the start of South Sudan’s ongoing civil war served only to reinforce how intractable that conflict has become. A peace deal is in tatters, along with the country’s economy. With the return of the dry season, the combatants appear to be preparing for another round of fighting. And the United Nations is now warning of possible genocide. South Sudanese are keenly aware that after three years of fighting, the situation can still deteriorate further. Since the end of October, more than 280,000 people have fled the country. According to the U.N.’s refugee agency, that […]

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