Instead of Waiving Vaccine Patents, Build the Global South’s Capacity

Instead of Waiving Vaccine Patents, Build the Global South’s Capacity
Exhausted workers who carried the dead for cremation sit on the rear step of an ambulance in New Delhi, India, April 24, 2021 (AP photo by Altaf Qadri).

When the Biden administration made its surprise announcement last week that it would seek to waive American patent protections on coronavirus vaccines, many were quick to cheer this as evidence that the president’s much-beloved slogan about global leadership, “America’s back,” was already becoming something more than mere rhetoric. Here was Washington appearing to put self-interest aside for the benefit of global public health, and in doing so, it would not only be taking on the American pharmaceutical giants that had pioneered the most important vaccine technologies in the first phase of this crisis, but also those of America’s European allies, […]

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