Despite 2013 Deal, Chemical Weapons Are Now Routine in Syria’s War

Chemical weapons being transported out of Syria on a Danish cargo ship, May 13, 2014 (AP photo by Petros Karadjias).
Chemical weapons being transported out of Syria on a Danish cargo ship, May 13, 2014 (AP photo by Petros Karadjias).
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In August, in a village called Marea, north of Aleppo, a mortar loaded with mustard gas and allegedly fired by militants from the self-declared Islamic State landed on a house. The chemical weapons badly burned three family members inside and killed an infant. Months earlier, between March and May, helicopters from Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s regime dropped barrel bombs on the rebel-held province of Idlib. Unlike the usual rudimentary explosives favored by Assad’s forces, these barrels were loaded with toxic chemicals, most likely chlorine. At least six people were killed, including three children from the same family. The details of […]

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