Democracy and Accountability Limit Corruption in Mauritius

Mauritius’ prime minister, Anerood Jugnauth, addresses a session during the India Africa Forum Summit, New Delhi, India, Oct. 29, 2015 (AP photo by Saurabh Das).
Mauritius’ prime minister, Anerood Jugnauth, addresses a session during the India Africa Forum Summit, New Delhi, India, Oct. 29, 2015 (AP photo by Saurabh Das).

Editor’s note: This article is part of an ongoing WPR series on the impact of corruption and various countries’ efforts to combat it. Last month, the prime minister of Mauritius, Anerood Jugnauth, asked his environment minister to resign following corruption allegations. In an email interview, Roopanand Mahadew, a lecturer in human rights law at the University of Mauritius, discussed the country’s successes in fighting corruption. WPR: How big a problem is corruption in Mauritius, and to the degree it is one, how does it manifest itself in daily life and politics? Roopanand Mahadew: Mauritius was ranked first among African nations […]

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