Congolese Activists, Tired of Waiting, Demand Justice for Decades-Old War Crimes

Nobel Peace Prize laureate Denis Mukwege speaks at a news conference in Oslo, Norway, Dec. 11, 2018 (NTB Scanpix photo by Lise Aserud via AP).
Nobel Peace Prize laureate Denis Mukwege speaks at a news conference in Oslo, Norway, Dec. 11, 2018 (NTB Scanpix photo by Lise Aserud via AP).
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In 2018, the Congolese gynecologist Denis Mukwege was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to end rape as a weapon of war. Speaking to a rapt and tearful audience at that year’s Nobel award ceremony in Oslo, he mentioned a report that was “gathering mold in an office drawer in New York.” The 550-page tome he referred to was released by the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights in October 2010. It painstakingly documented and mapped the locations of 617 instances of war crimes, crimes against humanity, and perhaps even genocide, allegedly committed by local combatants, militias […]

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