Darfur’s Conflict Might Be Forgotten, but It’s Not Over

A sand storm over the African Union-United Nations Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) headquarters, El Fasher, North Darfur, Aug. 8, 2015 (UNAMID photo by Adrian Dragnea).
A sand storm over the African Union-United Nations Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) headquarters, El Fasher, North Darfur, Aug. 8, 2015 (UNAMID photo by Adrian Dragnea).
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Jacob Berry is searching for any sign he can return to the home in Darfur he fled 13 years ago. In 2003, near the outset of the ongoing conflict in Darfur, a Khartoum-backed militia attacked Berry’s village. In their efforts to root out a rebel movement, government troops and state-supported fighters have committed countless targeted atrocities against civilians, and Berry’s village was not spared. Houses were set alight, residents scattered, and an unknown number of people killed, including his father and brother. Berry, then 15, fled all the way to Libya’s Mediterranean coast, before boarding a boat for Alexandria, Egypt. […]

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