Cuba’s Communists Face Contradiction of Economic Reform vs. Ideology

Cuban President Raul Castro at the Seventh Congress of the Cuban Communist Party, Havana, April 18, 2016 (AP photo by Ismael Francisco).
Cuban President Raul Castro at the Seventh Congress of the Cuban Communist Party, Havana, April 18, 2016 (AP photo by Ismael Francisco).
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The Seventh Congress of the Communist Party of Cuba ended Tuesday, April 19 with First Secretary Raul Castro declaring that the “principal tasks” of the party going forward are “the development of the national economy, along with the struggle for peace and ideological firmness.” That neatly summed up the major themes discussed by the 1,000 delegates during the previous three days, and the challenges the party faces on all three fronts as it manages normalizing ties with the United States and opening up its economy while preserving the state’s socialist identity. The economy was the main focus of the conclave, […]

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