COVID-19 Will Leave South Asia Poorer, Weaker and Less Democratic

People wearing masks ride a mini truck in Prayagraj, India, May 23, 2020 (AP photo by Rajesh Kumar Singh).
People wearing masks ride a mini truck in Prayagraj, India, May 23, 2020 (AP photo by Rajesh Kumar Singh).

The coronavirus pandemic, at least in its first wave, is not expected to peak in South Asia until July. But countries in the region, which have yet to witness a significant outbreak along the lines of China, the United States or the hardest-hit parts of Europe, are already loosening their lockdowns. The pandemic is spreading unevenly across the world for reasons that are not always entirely clear, so it is difficult to predict the public health impact of easing lockdowns. But what is clear is that the pandemic will leave South Asia poorer, less democratic and more illiberal. And China […]

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