Constitutional Rights Do Little to Ensure Gender Equality in Senegal

A young mother working at a marketplace, Yoff, Senegal, Oct. 14, 2015 (Bioversity International photo by Sandro Bozzolo via Flickr).
A young mother working at a marketplace, Yoff, Senegal, Oct. 14, 2015 (Bioversity International photo by Sandro Bozzolo via Flickr).
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Editor’s note: This article is part of an ongoing WPR series on the status of women’s rights and gender equality in various countries around the globe. A group of grandmothers on the outskirts of Senegal’s capital, Dakar, are using their influence in their village to promote modern health care and medicine in a bid to improve women’s health, a plan that nongovernmental organizations hope can be replicated across the country. In an email interview, Hawa Ba, the head of the Open Society Initiative for West Africa’s Senegal country office, discusses women’s rights in Senegal. WPR: What is the current status […]

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