Confronting East Asia’s Demographic Transition

Elderly people wait for their lunch at a charity for older people who live alone, Dingxing, China, May 13, 2021 (AP photo by Andy Wong).
Elderly people wait for their lunch at a charity for older people who live alone, Dingxing, China, May 13, 2021 (AP photo by Andy Wong).
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The results of China’s once-a-decade census, released in May after a one-month delay, showed that the population of mainland China grew at an average rate of 0.53 percent each year between 2010 and 2020. The official results contradicted an earlier report by the Financial Times, which indicated the census figures would actually show a population decline.  What is certain, though, is that the combination of higher life expectancies and lower fertility rates poses a huge challenge for East Asia’s largest economy, and for other major economies in the region as well. Japan, South Korea, Taiwan and Singapore all have population […]

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