Can South Korea’s Moon Revive Stalled Nuclear Talks With North Korea?

South Korean President Moon Jae-in during a meeting with his aides at the presidential Blue House in Seoul, South Korea, April 15, 2019 (Photo by Bae Jae-man for Yonhap via AP Images).
South Korean President Moon Jae-in during a meeting with his aides at the presidential Blue House in Seoul, South Korea, April 15, 2019 (Photo by Bae Jae-man for Yonhap via AP Images).

In the aftermath of the failed summit meeting between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Hanoi in February, the task of resuscitating talks over Pyongyang’s nuclear weapons program has fallen to the man who brokered Trump and Kim’s historic first meeting in June 2018: South Korean President Moon Jae-in. Moon’s willingness to again play the role of mediator is commendable, but he faces an uphill climb. The surprising breakdown of talks in Hanoi revealed nothing if not the extent to which the United States and North Korea misunderstand each other. U.S. negotiators understandably turned […]

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