Can Nairobi’s Citizens Tackle Their City’s Rapid Urbanization?

Residents lower furniture down to the street as they and others are evicted from their apartment blocks near the site of the building collapse, Nairobi, Kenya, May 6, 2016 (AP photo by Ben Curtis).
Residents lower furniture down to the street as they and others are evicted from their apartment blocks near the site of the building collapse, Nairobi, Kenya, May 6, 2016 (AP photo by Ben Curtis).
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In this week’s Trend Lines podcast, WPR’s editor-in-chief, Judah Grunstein, and host Peter Dörrie discuss the backlash against liberalized trade in the context of the Brexit referendum. For the Report, Abigail Higgins joins us to talk about the challenges Nairobi’s rapid urbanization poses to daily life. Listen:Download: MP3Subscribe: iTunes | RSS Relevant Articles on WPR: In Dealing a Blow Against Globalization, Brexit Highlights Interconnectedness Is the Global Middle Class Really Here to Stay? The TPP Is the Last, Best Opportunity for New Global Trade Rules The Grass-Roots Efforts That Will Help Nairobi Urbanize Quickly—and Well Trend Lines is produced, edited […]

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