Can a New Court Deliver Long-Awaited Justice in the Central African Republic?

Voters queue to cast their ballots in the second round of the presidential election, Bangui, Central African Republic, Feb. 14, 2016 (AP photo by Jerome Delay).
Voters queue to cast their ballots in the second round of the presidential election, Bangui, Central African Republic, Feb. 14, 2016 (AP photo by Jerome Delay).
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A new court in the Central African Republic has justice advocates hoping the notoriously unstable nation might finally see some accountability for grave human rights violations committed on its soil. Architects of the United Nations-backed Special Criminal Court describe it as a low-cost way of holding trials for atrocity crimes that could also provide a new model for collaboration between domestic and international justice efforts. But the court faces a daunting array of potential challenges, chief among them renewed violence, scarce funds and weak political will—all factors that have doomed accountability initiatives there in the past. On Feb. 15, Congolese […]

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