Cambodia’s Crooked Election and the Tragedy of Its Postwar Period

Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen greets supporters at a campaign event, Phnom Penh, July 7, 2018 (AP photo by Heng Sinith). 
Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen greets supporters at a campaign event, Phnom Penh, July 7, 2018 (AP photo by Heng Sinith). 

Prime Minister Hun Sen and his Cambodian People’s Party now utterly dominate Cambodia, after the CPP won control of the entire lower house of parliament in elections late last month. The regime had, of course, ensured in advance that the CPP would sweep the vote, the culmination of Hun Sen’s increasingly brazen repression. There were few if any impartial observers on election day. With Cambodia’s political regression all but complete, what is left for the remnants of the opposition? How will key international donors and foreign countries respond, and what’s next for Hun Sen himself? The Cambodia National Rescue Party, […]

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