Bachelet’s Labor Policy Leaves No One Happy in Chile

Public workers protest outside La Moneda presidential palace, Santiago, Chile, Nov. 17, 2016 (AP photo by Luis Hidalgo).
Public workers protest outside La Moneda presidential palace, Santiago, Chile, Nov. 17, 2016 (AP photo by Luis Hidalgo).
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A nearly month-long strike by Chile’s public sector employees ended earlier this month after workers failed to win a pay increase of 7 percent and instead reluctantly accepted President Michelle Bachelet’s initial proposal of a 3.2 percent raise. In an email interview, Peter M. Siavelis, a professor of politics and international affairs and the director of the Latin American and Latino studies program at Wake Forest University, discusses labor relations in Chile. WPR: What are the public sector’s grievances with President Michelle Bachelet’s administration, and how have they affected relations between the government and public employees? Peter M. Siavelis: The […]

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