The G-20 Was Made for Moments Like This

Italian Premier Mario Draghi addresses the media during a press conference, Rome, Oct. 5, 2021 (AP photo by Andrew Medichini).
Italian Premier Mario Draghi addresses the media during a press conference, Rome, Oct. 5, 2021 (AP photo by Andrew Medichini).

When the leaders of the G-20’s member states convene for their Oct. 30-31 summit in Rome, there will be no time for fiddling. The planet is on fire. The pandemic smolders on. And the global recovery is faltering. The G-20 was created for just such a moment and just such challenges. To meet them, the assembled heads of governments must make credible commitments to accelerate decarbonization, expand vaccine access and alleviate developing nations’ crushing burden of debt.  The G-20 was born out of crisis—or crises, to be exact. It first emerged in 1999 as an informal network of finance ministers […]

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