go to top
A woman visits the Holocaust Memorial, Berlin, Germany. A woman visits the Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe, also known as the Holocaust Memorial, Berlin, Germany, Nov. 1, 2021 (AP photo by Markus Schreiber).

Collective Memory of Injustice Starts With a Conscious Choice

Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2022

Last Friday, Jan. 27, marked the 77th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz concentration camps, a day now observed as International Holocaust Remembrance Day. Many used the occasion to commemorate loved ones they lost, to hear stories from Holocaust survivors and to reflect on the tragically destructive capabilities of humankind. Others used it to highlight the persistence of antisemitism worldwide, taking the opportunity to urge us to do “everything we can to make sure it never happens again.” 

Almost eight decades later, however, many survivors of the Holocaust are no longer alive to share their stories. This prompts some interesting questions about remembrance and collective memory. And in that light, it is worth reflecting on why some traumatic events in history are remembered more than others, how best to commemorate such events and how all this shapes the legacy we leave to future generations.  ...

To read more,

enter your email address then choose one of the three options below.

Subscribe to World Politics Review and you'll receive instant access to 10,000+ articles in the World Politics Review Library, along with new comprehensive analysis every weekday . . . written by leading topic experts.