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A TV screen shows a news report about North Korea’s SLBM missiles. A TV screen at the Seoul Railway Station shows a news report about North Korea’s SLBM missiles displayed at a military parade, Seoul, South Korea, Jan. 15, 2021 (AP photo by Lee Jin-man).

The Two Koreas’ Recent Arms Displays Are Sending Very Different Messages

Thursday, Oct. 21, 2021

North Korea has announced that it successfully tested a new, smaller submarine-launched ballistic missile, or SLBM, on Tuesday. State media claimed the missile—launched from the same submarine from which Pyongyang tested its first Pukguksong-1 SLBM in August 2016—has “advanced control guidance technologies, including flank mobility and gliding skip mobility,” designed to make it harder to track and intercept. The name of the submarine used for the launch—the “8.24 Yongung”—also seems noteworthy, as a reflection of the importance Pyongyang puts on this vessel: It means “hero” and apparently signifies the Aug. 24 date of the 2016 SLBM launch.

The test is another sign that Pyongyang is trying to secure a second-strike capability—the ability to respond to a nuclear attack with its own nuclear weapons. The aim would be to protect the regime and perhaps even cause Washington to hesitate in defending Seoul in the event of an attack, for fear of possible North Korean SLBM strikes. ...

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