go to top
A woman reads a newspaper showing the results of the previous day’s referendum, Santiago, Chile A woman reads a newspaper showing the results of the previous day’s referendum in favor of rewriting the nation’s constitution, in Santiago, Chile, Oct. 26, 2020 (AP photo by Esteban Felix).

Chile Prepares to Write a New Constitution—and a New Social Contract

Monday, Nov. 16, 2020

SANTIAGO, Chile—It is no exaggeration to suggest that Chile’s constitutional referendum last month was its most important vote since the country transitioned to democracy in 1989. Voters faced two decisions: first, whether a new constitution should be written, and second, if the answer on the first question is affirmative, who should write it. An entirely new body could be elected for that purpose, or a mixed convention could be held, in which half the delegates would be current members of parliament.

Ahead of the Oct. 25 referendum, polls showed that a majority of Chileans wanted a new constitution, but nobody expected such a landslide: 78 percent voted in favor of changing the constitution through a specially elected constitutional convention. Chilean voters will go to the polls again next April to choose the members of that body. ...

To read more,

enter your email address then choose one of the three options below.

Subscribe to World Politics Review and you'll receive instant access to 10,000+ articles in the World Politics Review Library, along with new comprehensive analysis every weekday . . . written by leading topic experts.