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A military officer patrols outside the bombed St Anthony’s Church, currently under reconstruction, in Colombo. A military officer patrols outside the bombed St Anthony’s Church, currently under reconstruction, in Colombo, Sri Lanka, May 20, 2019 (Yomiuri Shimbun photo by Sho Komine via AP Images).

Sri Lanka’s Radical Approach to Deradicalization Worked Before. It Can Again

Monday, Sept. 9, 2019

In the four months since coordinated suicide bombers killed more than 250 people across Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday, the country’s embattled government has been forced to grapple with a common question in the post-9/11 era. How do you stop enemies willing to kill themselves for a political or religious cause?

For Prime Minister Ranil Wickremesinghe, one answer has been to accept blame for errors in policing and intelligence gathering while calling on other countries to help curb the scourge of violent extremism. But even as Sri Lanka’s leaders look abroad for support, they must not forget that one of the world’s best blueprints for deradicalization was actually written at home. ...

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