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South Sudan’s president, Salva Kiir, is welcomed by Italian Premier Giuseppe Conte in Rome. South Sudan’s president, Salva Kiir, is welcomed by Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte, second from left, at Chigi Palace in Rome, Italy, April 10, 2019 (AP photo by Alessandra Tarantino).

One Year On, South Sudan’s Stalled Peace Deal Is Proving Its Skeptics Right

Friday, Aug. 30, 2019

Last September, South Sudan’s president, Salva Kiir, signed a power-sharing deal with rebel leader Riek Machar, promising to bring an end to the five-year civil war that has crippled the world’s newest country, which declared its independence from Sudan in 2011. It wasn’t the first time. A similar agreement signed in 2015 broke down the following year, leading to fighting that prompted Machar to flee the country.

Observers predicted the new agreement would share the fate of its predecessor. What was billed as a “revitalized” peace plan was still silent on many of the underlying drivers of violence and seemed in many ways to be a stale retread of a deal that had already failed to deliver on its promise. ...

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