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Protesters attach stickers that read “Apology” to a fellow protester wearing a mask of U.S. President Donald Trump during a rally against Washington’s handling of the North Korea issue, Seoul, South Korea, May 25, 2018 (AP photo by Ahn Young-joon).

How South Koreans Are Coping With the Chaos of Trump’s High-Risk Diplomacy

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

After the initial public euphoria about an imminent breakthrough in their decades-long crisis with North Korea, South Koreans who work professionally on foreign and national security policy are taking a more strategic and sober view of recent events. Many worry about the consequences of a change in their relationship with the United States, while others see important economic and political opportunities ahead.

I just returned from a week of meetings in Seoul and Incheon with scholars from universities, government agencies and think tanks, as part of a delegation from George Mason University’s Schar School of Policy and Government. I came away with a more textured view of the mood in South Korea and how experts there calibrate the likely results of the flurry of diplomatic encounters in the region. ...

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