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Parliamentary candidates of Germany's Green Party protest U.S. President Donald Trump's decision to exit the Paris climate agreement, in front the the U.S. Embassy, Berlin, June 2, 2017 (DPA photo by Britta Pedersen via AP).

The Future of Climate Diplomacy After Trump’s Exit From the Paris Agreement

Friday, June 2, 2017

After months of speculation, President Donald Trump announced Thursday his decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris climate change agreement. The move came in the face of high-profile pressure from a diverse set of voices—everyone from Pope Francis and U.S. military brass to business leaders such as Tesla CEO Elon Musk and ExxonMobil CEO Darren Woods, and other members of the G-7 had urged the U.S. president to remain in the accord. Nevertheless, Trump declared in the White House Rose Garden that “we’re getting out” of the landmark deal to reduce global carbon emissions.

Trump immediately added that “we will start to negotiate, and we will see if we can make a deal that’s fair. And if we can, that’s great. And if we can’t, that’s fine.” A day earlier, White House insiders had leaked Trump’s decision to fulfill one of his campaign pledges to “cancel” an agreement he slammed during last year’s election. His announcement starts the clock on Article 28 of the agreement, which means the United States would formally exit the deal on November 4, 2020 at the earliest. ...

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