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U.S. President Donald Trump during a joint news conference with British Prime Minister Theresa May, Washington D.C., Jan. 27, 2017 (AP photo by Pablo Martinez Monsivais).

What Does the Populist Wave Mean for Global Aid and Development?

Tuesday, Feb. 21, 2017

In November, Nobel laureate Muhammad Yunus warned that a growing gap between the super rich and the rest of the world’s population is a “ticking time bomb” that will lead to exploitation of the poor, immigrants and minorities. There is good evidence that time is running out to keep that bomb from going off.

Economic fragility in the eurozone has fueled the rise of populist and nationalist parties in European elections since 2008. The refugee crisis confronting Europe compounded the swing. A wave of populist wins in 2016, from Brexit and Italy’s rejection of constitutional reform to the election of Donald Trump as president of the United States, further shook the establishment. In 2017, establishment parties in France, Germany and the Netherlands will face electoral battles against far-right figures in a climate of angst over the economy and security, and amid rising anti-immigrant sentiment. ...

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