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U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon speaks at a ceremony for the 70th anniversary of the United Nations, San Francisco, California, June 26, 2015 (AP photo by Jeff Chiu).

Parting Shot: Can Ban Ki-moon Save U.N. Peacekeeping?

Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2015

In the first half of August this year, something snapped inside Ban Ki-moon. The secretary-general of the United Nations demanded that the leader of the U.N. operation in the Central African Republic (CAR), Senegalese Gen. Babacar Gaye, should resign.

The mission, known by its French acronym MINUSCA, was buckling under the weight of stories about sexual abuse by U.N. troops. “Enough is enough,” Ban told the press. Gaye did not go quietly. He had, he pointed out in his resignation letter, insisted on a “zero tolerance” policy toward the abuse. He previously served the U.N. in the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Middle East, making it all the more regrettable that his “long and faithful service” should come to an “abrupt and inglorious end.” But the secretary-general had asked him to go, and he would do so. ...

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