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Police prevent demonstrators marking Teacher's Day from approaching the Zocalo plaza in Mexico City, May 15, 2015 (AP photo by Marco Ugarte).

Mexico’s Education Dispute Reflects Wider Obstacles to Reform

Friday, Aug. 14, 2015

The ongoing fight over education reform in Mexico has often resembled a popular uprising rather than a labor dispute. Over the past two years, members of a powerful teachers’ union from the south of the country have occupied plazas, hijacked local radio stations and disrupted elections in their bid to have a controversial 2013 bill restructuring Mexico’s public school system revoked.

The clash between union leaders and the federal government has defined much of President Enrique Pena Nieto’s time in office, as he has pursued an ambitious reform agenda that has stalled under corruption allegations and popular unrest, mostly over the brutal death of 43 students at the hands of police and a local drug cartel. But the education battle also reflects underlying issues of patronage politics and the devolution of power since Mexico’s democratic transition began in the 1990s. ...

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