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Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban delivers his speech during a ceremony to mark the 57th anniversary of the 1956 uprising in Budapest, Hungary, Oct. 23, 2013. (AP Photo/MTI, Tibor Illyes).

Illiberal Democracy: How Hungary’s Orban Is Testing Europe

Thursday, Dec. 18, 2014

“A nation on the verge of ceding its sovereignty to a neo-fascist dictator, getting in bed with Vladimir Putin,” Sen. John McCain called it, addressing the United States Senate earlier this month. McCain was talking about a NATO ally, a European Union member state and an enthusiastic member both of President George W. Bush’s Coalition of the Willing in Iraq and the international force in Afghanistan: Hungary.

What has gone wrong? Most of Hungary’s growing band of international critics lay the blame squarely at the door of Prime Minister Viktor Orban. A former liberal opponent of communism, Orban now stands accused of changing the constitution to centralize power in his hands, seeking to control the media and adopting economic policies that have driven out foreign investors in favor of a group of oligarchs around him. ...

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