Another Brief Truce Ends in Libya, as Civilians Are Still Trapped in the Middle

Fighters from Libya’s U.N.-backed Government of National Accord clash with forces of the self-styled Libyan National Army at the Salah al-Din frontline, Tripoli, Libya, July 29, 2019 (Photo by Amru Salahuddien for dpa via AP Images).
Fighters from Libya’s U.N.-backed Government of National Accord clash with forces of the self-styled Libyan National Army at the Salah al-Din frontline, Tripoli, Libya, July 29, 2019 (Photo by Amru Salahuddien for dpa via AP Images).
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Editor’s Note: Every Friday, Andrew Green curates the top news and analysis from and about the African continent. After a two-day truce to observe the Eid al-Adha holiday, fighting has resumed in Libya. Any hope that the brief pause might signal a path to the resolution of a conflict that erupted in April, when military strongman Khalifa Haftar began his campaign to conquer the capital, Tripoli, quickly evaporated. Since Haftar launched his assault on Tripoli, 1,100 people have been killed and more than 100,000 displaced. Even as the truce was announced, a car bomb exploded in the eastern city of […]

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