Amid Trump’s Foreign Policy Chaos, Who Speaks for the U.S.?

Donald Trump shakes hands with Qatar’s Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani during a bilateral meeting as Rex Tillerson, Jared Kushner and H.R. McMaster look on, Riyadh, May 21, 2017 (AP photo by Evan Vucci).
Donald Trump shakes hands with Qatar’s Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani during a bilateral meeting as Rex Tillerson, Jared Kushner and H.R. McMaster look on, Riyadh, May 21, 2017 (AP photo by Evan Vucci).

The crisis in America’s foreign policy apparatus entered a stunning new phase this past week with President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement, followed yesterday by his comments on Twitter essentially taking Saudi Arabia’s side against Qatar in an intra-Gulf dispute. In between, reports emerged that during his visit to Brussels two weeks ago, Trump removed a passage from his speech explicitly confirming his commitment to NATO’s collective defense clause, Article 5, without notifying his national security adviser, Gen. H.R. McMaster, Defense Secretary James Mattis and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, all of whom had argued […]

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