Can a Revamped Government Steer the UAE Through the Pandemic?

Can a Revamped Government Steer the UAE Through the Pandemic?
A lone taxi cab drives over a typically gridlocked highway in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, April 6, 2020 (AP photo by Jon Gambrell).

Amid its struggles with the public health and economic impacts of the coronavirus pandemic, the United Arab Emirates announced a wide-ranging restructuring of federal government agencies and senior personnel last month. The UAE’s prime minister and vice president, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, who rules the emirate of Dubai, detailed the shake-up in a series of tweets, saying it was intended to craft an “agile government quick in solidifying the achievement of our nation.” Previous government reshuffles in the small but wealthy Gulf nation were notable for their public relations aspects, such as the creation in 2016 of two […]

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