‘All of Us Are Unified Now.’ What the UAE-Israel Deal Means for Palestinians

Palestinians burn pictures of U.S. President Donald Trump, Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during a protest in Nablus, West Bank, Aug. 14, 2020 (AP photo by Majdi Mohammed).
Palestinians burn pictures of U.S. President Donald Trump, Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Zayed and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during a protest in Nablus, West Bank, Aug. 14, 2020 (AP photo by Majdi Mohammed).

The surprise deal between the United Arab Emirates and Israel, in which they agreed to normalize diplomatic relations in exchange for Israel suspending its plans to annex parts of the West Bank, has not been well-received by Palestinians. The so-called “Abraham Accord” makes the UAE only the third country in the Arab world, after Egypt and Jordan, to recognize the state of Israel, and more could soon follow. Many Palestinians see it as a betrayal. “It is a stab in the back of the Palestinian people,” Mustafa Barghouti, a member of the Palestine Liberation Organization’s central committee, told WPR. He […]

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