After Wild Campaign, Brazil Election Returns to Economy, Security

Aecio Neves, Brazilian Social Democracy Party presidential candidate, greets supporters while campaigning at Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Oct. 19, 2014 (AP photo by Felipe Dana).
Aecio Neves, Brazilian Social Democracy Party presidential candidate, greets supporters while campaigning at Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Oct. 19, 2014 (AP photo by Felipe Dana).

A wild Brazilian presidential campaign is nearing an end, its zigzagging story lines returning to where they began: with the incumbent, President Dilma Rousseff, ahead. After the death of Socialist Party candidate Eduardo Campos in a plane crash in August, the emergence of his running mate Marina Silva as the new Socialist candidate briefly upended the race, and had many expecting a runoff between two female candidates—a first-ever in Brazil. But that never happened. Instead, Silva came in a distant third behind Rousseff’s center-right challenger, Aecio Neves of the Brazilian Social Democratic Party, who now trails Rousseff by just a […]

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