After Niger, Is America’s ‘Light Footprint’ Counterterrorism Strategy Sustainable?

A U.S. Marine major walks past a line of soldiers from the Uganda People’s Defense Force as they engage in weapons training at the Singo facility in Kakola, Uganda, April 30, 2012 (AP photo by Ben Curtis).
A U.S. Marine major walks past a line of soldiers from the Uganda People’s Defense Force as they engage in weapons training at the Singo facility in Kakola, Uganda, April 30, 2012 (AP photo by Ben Curtis).
SUBSCRIBE NOW
Free Newsletter

The United States has always been a reluctant superpower. While most political leaders and observers have believed that promoting security around the world benefits the United States, the public has to be sold on the idea of global activism. Among other things, this makes it important to control the costs of involvement in distant places without direct ties to the United States, particularly U.S. military casualties. This has been done in two ways: by relying on security partners to bear the brunt of deterring and fighting adversaries, and by sustaining an advanced U.S. military to overmatch enemies when it does […]

TO READ MORE

Enter your email to get instant access to this article and to receive our free email newsletter:

Or, Subscribe now to get full access.

Already a subscriber? Log in here .

What you’ll get with an All-Access subscription to World Politics Review:

A WPR subscription is like no other resource — it’s like having your own personal researcher and analyst for news and events around the globe. Become a member now, and you’ll get:

  • Immediate and instant access to the full searchable library of 15,000+ articles
  • Daily articles with original analysis, written by leading topic experts, delivered to you every weekday
  • Daily links to must-read news, analysis, and opinion from top sources around the globe, curated by our keen-eyed team of editors
  • Weekly in-depth reports, including features on important countries and issues.
  • Your choice of weekly region-specific newsletters, delivered to your inbox.
  • Smartphone- and tablet-friendly website.

And all of this is available to you — right now for just $1 for the first 3 months.

More World Politics Review