After Helping Solve Gambia’s Political Crisis, Senegal Needs an Exit Strategy

A Senegalese soldier passes local children near Gambia's border with Senegal, Jan. 20, 2017 (AP photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui).
A Senegalese soldier passes local children near Gambia's border with Senegal, Jan. 20, 2017 (AP photo by Sylvain Cherkaoui).

Last February, in his address at Gambia’s 52nd Independence Day celebration, the country’s newly elected president, Adama Barrow, referred to Senegal, Gambia’s closest neighbor, as a “friend in times of need.” Just a month earlier, following unsuccessful diplomatic efforts to unseat longtime Gambian strongman Yahya Jammeh, Senegal led a military intervention into Gambia to push Jammeh out. Jammeh had ruled Gambia with an iron fist for 22 years and refused to relinquish power after losing presidential elections in December. Senegal then became a safe haven for Barrow, who was sworn in as Gambia’s president in the Gambian embassy in Dakar […]

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