With a New President, Ecuador Has a Chance to Heal

Guillermo Lasso, president-elect of Ecuador, speaks to supporters at his campaign headquarters following the runoff election, in Guayaquil, Ecuador, April 11, 2021 (AP photo by Angel Dejesus).
Guillermo Lasso, president-elect of Ecuador, speaks to supporters at his campaign headquarters following the runoff election, in Guayaquil, Ecuador, April 11, 2021 (AP photo by Angel Dejesus).

Even in the throes of the coronavirus pandemic and a mismanaged economic austerity package, former President Rafael Correa’s bitter legacy of corruption and authoritarianism outweighed the promise of a return to the lavish social spending of the left-wing populist’s time in power. That appears to be the takeaway from the surprise victory of conservative banker Guillermo Lasso, 65, in Ecuador’s hard-fought presidential runoff election on April 11. With the Andean nation’s economic model at stake—not to mention its free press and arguably its democracy—Lasso overturned a 13-point loss in the February first round to defeat Correa’s protégé, Andres Arauz, 52.4 […]

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