The West Should Take a Backseat to Africa on African Security Crises

The West Should Take a Backseat to Africa on African Security Crises
Former Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta, African Union envoy Olusegun Obasanjo and former South African Vice President Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka pose with the lead negotiators for Ethiopia and Tigray after peace talks in Pretoria, South Africa, Nov. 2, 2022 (AP photo by Themba Hadebe).

Even as both sides in Ethiopia implement the first steps of a peace accord, the impact of its civil war can be seen in regional and international responses to other conflicts in Africa. That could presage deep changes in how the West engages with African security issues, and the distribution of roles in addressing them.

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