A Scandal in Brussels Captures Everything Europhobes Can’t Stand About the EU

The new secretary-general of the European Commission, Martin Selmayr, waits for the start of a meeting at EU headquarters, Brussels, March 7, 2018 (AP photo by Virginia Mayo).
The new secretary-general of the European Commission, Martin Selmayr, waits for the start of a meeting at EU headquarters, Brussels, March 7, 2018 (AP photo by Virginia Mayo).

Italy’s elections on Sunday refocused global attention on the challenges facing the European Union, as populist, euroskeptic parties combined to win a majority of votes. But a less-noticed scandal over a bureaucratic appointment in Brussels might offer a better explanation of just what is driving the voter backlash against the union. So far the scandal has barely registered a blip on the radar for anyone besides close EU-watchers, but it is in many ways emblematic of everything Brussels’ critics say is wrong with the bloc. It revolves around Martin Selmayr, the former chief of staff to European Commission President Jean-Claude […]

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