A Reluctant China May Be the Last Hope for South Sudan

Details of the uniform of China's peacekeeping infantry battalion of the United Nations Mission in the Republic of South Sudan (UNMISS), Juba, South Sudan, Feb. 27, 2015 (U.N. photo by JC McIlwaine).
Details of the uniform of China's peacekeeping infantry battalion of the United Nations Mission in the Republic of South Sudan (UNMISS), Juba, South Sudan, Feb. 27, 2015 (U.N. photo by JC McIlwaine).
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Can anyone save South Sudan? The country, which collapsed into civil war in 2013, is stumbling into a new cycle of violence. Clashes in the capital, Juba, have claimed hundreds of lives in recent days. The United Nations Security Council has called for calm, and the U.S., which played a leading role in ushering in South Sudan’s independence five years ago, has condemned the violence. Yet the outbreak of fighting poses an especially serious dilemma for another power with significant economic and political interests at stake: China. Beijing is playing an increasing military and diplomatic role across Africa, as I […]

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