A Kazakh Appointment Highlights the OSCE’s Many Challenges

Kairat Abdrakhmanov, then serving as Kazakhstan’s foreign minister, at a meeting in Beijing, April 24, 2018 (pool photo by Madoka Ikegami for Kyodo, via AP Images).
Kairat Abdrakhmanov, then serving as Kazakhstan’s foreign minister, at a meeting in Beijing, April 24, 2018 (pool photo by Madoka Ikegami for Kyodo, via AP Images).
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For the first time, an official from a former Soviet country has been named to a senior position at the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe. Kairat Abdrakhmanov, a well-regarded diplomat who served as Kazakhstan’s foreign minister from 2016 until 2018, was appointed earlier this month as the OSCE’s new high commissioner for minorities. His job will be to protect the rights of ethnic minorities in the OSCE’s 57 member states—part of a broad commitment to protecting human rights that was enshrined in the 1975 Helsinki Accords, which stabilized relations between the Soviet bloc and the West at the […]

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