A Haitian Solution to Haiti’s Crisis

A man searches for his passport among the wreckage of his grandmother’s collapsed house, in Maniche, Haiti, Aug. 24, 2021 (AP photo by Matias Delacroix).
A man searches for his passport among the wreckage of his grandmother’s collapsed house, in Maniche, Haiti, Aug. 24, 2021 (AP photo by Matias Delacroix).

Relief efforts are continuing in Haiti following the 7.2-magnitude earthquake that hit the country on Aug. 14, causing widespread destruction in the southern peninsula, near the quake’s epicenter. The death toll has surpassed 2,200, with 344 people still missing, according to the Haitian Civil Protection Agency. More than 12,000 people have been injured and nearly 53,000 houses destroyed. The disaster occurred during a deep political crisis in Haiti, which took a tragic and unexpected turn when President Jovenel Moise was assassinated on July 7. Before that, Moise had been governing mainly through executive orders due to his failure to organize […]

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