A Debilitating Corruption Scandal Threatens More Damage to Mongolia’s Economy

A child walks past Mongolians protesting corruption in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, March 31, 2017 (AP photo by Ganbat Namjilsangarav).
A child walks past Mongolians protesting corruption in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, March 31, 2017 (AP photo by Ganbat Namjilsangarav).

Mongolia has been rocked in recent months by a series of corruption scandals that have prompted large-scale demonstrations in the capital, Ulaanbaatar. The government of Prime Minister Ukhnaagiin Khurelsukh has been paralyzed by revelations that senior government officials, including members of his Cabinet, misused funds that were intended to assist small and medium-sized enterprises. In an interview with WPR, Morris Rossabi, a professor of East Asian history at Columbia University, explains why corruption is so widespread in Mongolia and why the current wave of scandals comes at a particularly bad time for its economy. World Politics Review: Why is corruption […]

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