A Controversial Omnibus Law Could Spell Trouble for Indonesia’s Democracy

Indonesian workers protest against the controversial omnibus bill, in Tangerang, Indonesia, Oct. 7, 2020 (AP photo by Dita Alangkara).
Indonesian workers protest against the controversial omnibus bill, in Tangerang, Indonesia, Oct. 7, 2020 (AP photo by Dita Alangkara).

In early November, Indonesian President Joko Widodo approved a controversial omnibus law that is meant to bolster Indonesia’s economy by reducing regulations and bureaucracy in areas from mining to forestry and labor to business licensing. Jokowi, as the president is known in Indonesia, has touted such reforms for years; he has claimed the new, landmark Job Creation Law, which clocks in at nearly 1,200 pages, will “create an additional 1 million jobs a year and increase worker productivity, which is below average in Southeast Asia.” Indonesia certainly does need a reduction in red tape, which has long hindered domestic and […]

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