A Citizen Victory Against Corruption: Guatemala After Perez Molina

Guatemalan President Otto Perez Molina sits in court where he faces corruption charges, after he submitted his resignation in Guatemala City, Sept. 3, 2015 (AP photo/Esteban Felix).
Guatemalan President Otto Perez Molina sits in court where he faces corruption charges, after he submitted his resignation in Guatemala City, Sept. 3, 2015 (AP photo/Esteban Felix).

After months of peaceful protests, Guatemalan President Otto Perez Molina was stripped of immunity and forced to step down last week. He now faces charges of illicit association, customs fraud and bribery for his alleged role in a massive corruption scheme. A judge has ordered that he remain in jail until his trial in December. Over a dozen public officials, including former Vice President Roxana Baldetti, Cabinet members and government ministers, have been arrested and put on trial for their participation in the criminal network. The corruption scandals uncovered by the Public Prosecutor’s Office and the U.N.-led International Commission against […]

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