Media Roundup

United States

Top News

U.S. Approves Sale of Warships to Taiwan

By Aries Poon | The Wall Street Journal

The U.S. approved the sale to Taiwan of four used warships, drawing a swift rebuke from China, which called the move damaging to Chinese security interests.

Sony Hack Leaves U.S. in Quandary on How to Deal With North Korea

By Christi Parsons and Brian Bennett | Los Angeles Times

With U.S. intelligence analysts quietly pointing to North Korea as having a hand in the destructive hack of Sony Pictures Entertainment computers, Obama administration officials scrambled Thursday to consider what, if anything, they should do in response.

Opinion

Jeb, Hillary and the Fog of Uncertainty

By Amir Taheri | Asharq Alawsat

By all accounts, the United States is in need of new leadership capable of providing it with some direction in an age of uncertainty. Led by President Barack Obama into a dense fog of incertitude about its place in the world, the US today vacillates between the perceived comfort of isolation and the very American aspiration to leadership.

The U.S. Needs a Free-Trade Deal With China

By Maurice Greenberg and Fred Bergsten | The Wall Street Journal

The benefits? How about an extra $400 billion in American exports each year, and $100 billion in national income.

The Americas

Top News

Crucial Spy in Cuba Paid a Heavy Cold War Price

By Mark Mazzetti, Michael S. Schmidt and Frances Robles | The New York Times

Rolando Sarraff Trujillo, who was released Wednesday from a Cuban prison where he had been held since 1995, provided information on codes used by Cuban spies.

Opinion

Off the Radar

Colombia’s Government Rebuffs Rebel Truce

By Llibardo Cardona | The Associated Press

Colombia’s government has rebuffed a unilateral truce declared by the country’s largest rebel group, saying conditions demanded by the guerrillas’ are unacceptable until a peace deal is reached.

Europe

Opinion

Putin’s Bubble Bursts

By Paul Krugman | The New York Times

The global plunge in oil prices and the falling ruble have wreaked havoc on the Russian economy. It’s been quite a comedown for the strongman.

Revenge of the Ruble: What the Crisis Means for Putin

By Daniel Cloud | Foreign Affairs

The ruble has already lost almost half its value against the dollar this year, and there is little doubt that Putin will end up badly wounded. The question is whether he will drag his country down with him, turning Russia into a full-fledged pariah state.

Off the Radar

Dutch Cabinet Crisis Deepens

By Mike Corder | The Associated Press

The Netherlands’ prime minister has canceled plans to attend a European summit in Brussels in order to focus his full attention on a domestic political spat that is threatening to cause the collapse of his 2-year-old governing coalition.

Africa

Top News

Off the Radar

EU Calls for Expanded Arms Embargo on South Sudan

Sudan Tribune

The European Union has slapped an arms embargo on South Sudan over its failure to resolve the country’s ongoing conflict, calling on the international community to also consider taking tougher action.

Middle East

Top News

Iraqi Kurds Press Fightback as Top Jihadist Reported Killed

By Abdelhamid Zebari | Agence France-Presse

Kurdish forces pressed their biggest offensive against the Islamic State group so far on Friday, buoyed by US reports that jihadist supremo Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi's top aide in Iraq has been killed.

Opinion

Asia / Pacific

Top News

Indonesia Wants to Aid U.S. in Islamic State Fight, Top Military Commander Says

By Guy Taylor | The Washington Times

Indonesia's top military commander said in an interview that the world's most populous Muslim nation sees the Islamic State movement in Syria and Iraq as a grave threat to the world and that Jakarta wants to increase coordination with Washington to counter the radical group's rise in Southeast Asia.

Pakistani Military Says It Kills 32 Militants in Ambush

By Jibran Ahmad | Reuters

The Pakistani army said it has killed 59 militants in clashes in the northwest, including 32 in an ambush in a remote valley near the Afghan border, in intensified fighting since this week's Taliban massacre of children at a school.

Opinion

Pakistan’s 9/11?

By Ayesha Siddiqa | The New York Times

Terrorism endures because the political and military elites’ attitude toward radical groups is opportunistic.

Pakistan After the Peshawar Massacre

By Shahid Javed Burki | Project Syndicate

The assault on the military school was the single deadliest attack in the Taliban’s history. The question now is whether it will turn out to be a turning point for Pakistan in its relations with the group.

Off the Radar

Top News

U.S. Approves Sale of Warships to Taiwan

By Aries Poon | The Wall Street Journal

The U.S. approved the sale to Taiwan of four used warships, drawing a swift rebuke from China, which called the move damaging to Chinese security interests.

Sony Hack Leaves U.S. in Quandary on How to Deal With North Korea

By Christi Parsons and Brian Bennett | Los Angeles Times

With U.S. intelligence analysts quietly pointing to North Korea as having a hand in the destructive hack of Sony Pictures Entertainment computers, Obama administration officials scrambled Thursday to consider what, if anything, they should do in response.

Opinion

Jeb, Hillary and the Fog of Uncertainty

By Amir Taheri | Asharq Alawsat

By all accounts, the United States is in need of new leadership capable of providing it with some direction in an age of uncertainty. Led by President Barack Obama into a dense fog of incertitude about its place in the world, the US today vacillates between the perceived comfort of isolation and the very American aspiration to leadership.

The U.S. Needs a Free-Trade Deal With China

By Maurice Greenberg and Fred Bergsten | The Wall Street Journal

The benefits? How about an extra $400 billion in American exports each year, and $100 billion in national income.

Top News

Crucial Spy in Cuba Paid a Heavy Cold War Price

By Mark Mazzetti, Michael S. Schmidt and Frances Robles | The New York Times

Rolando Sarraff Trujillo, who was released Wednesday from a Cuban prison where he had been held since 1995, provided information on codes used by Cuban spies.

Opinion

Off the Radar

Colombia’s Government Rebuffs Rebel Truce

By Llibardo Cardona | The Associated Press

Colombia’s government has rebuffed a unilateral truce declared by the country’s largest rebel group, saying conditions demanded by the guerrillas’ are unacceptable until a peace deal is reached.

Opinion

Putin’s Bubble Bursts

By Paul Krugman | The New York Times

The global plunge in oil prices and the falling ruble have wreaked havoc on the Russian economy. It’s been quite a comedown for the strongman.

Revenge of the Ruble: What the Crisis Means for Putin

By Daniel Cloud | Foreign Affairs

The ruble has already lost almost half its value against the dollar this year, and there is little doubt that Putin will end up badly wounded. The question is whether he will drag his country down with him, turning Russia into a full-fledged pariah state.

Off the Radar

Dutch Cabinet Crisis Deepens

By Mike Corder | The Associated Press

The Netherlands’ prime minister has canceled plans to attend a European summit in Brussels in order to focus his full attention on a domestic political spat that is threatening to cause the collapse of his 2-year-old governing coalition.

Top News

Off the Radar

EU Calls for Expanded Arms Embargo on South Sudan

Sudan Tribune

The European Union has slapped an arms embargo on South Sudan over its failure to resolve the country’s ongoing conflict, calling on the international community to also consider taking tougher action.

Top News

Iraqi Kurds Press Fightback as Top Jihadist Reported Killed

By Abdelhamid Zebari | Agence France-Presse

Kurdish forces pressed their biggest offensive against the Islamic State group so far on Friday, buoyed by US reports that jihadist supremo Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi's top aide in Iraq has been killed.

Opinion

Top News

Indonesia Wants to Aid U.S. in Islamic State Fight, Top Military Commander Says

By Guy Taylor | The Washington Times

Indonesia's top military commander said in an interview that the world's most populous Muslim nation sees the Islamic State movement in Syria and Iraq as a grave threat to the world and that Jakarta wants to increase coordination with Washington to counter the radical group's rise in Southeast Asia.

Pakistani Military Says It Kills 32 Militants in Ambush

By Jibran Ahmad | Reuters

The Pakistani army said it has killed 59 militants in clashes in the northwest, including 32 in an ambush in a remote valley near the Afghan border, in intensified fighting since this week's Taliban massacre of children at a school.

Opinion

Pakistan’s 9/11?

By Ayesha Siddiqa | The New York Times

Terrorism endures because the political and military elites’ attitude toward radical groups is opportunistic.

Pakistan After the Peshawar Massacre

By Shahid Javed Burki | Project Syndicate

The assault on the military school was the single deadliest attack in the Taliban’s history. The question now is whether it will turn out to be a turning point for Pakistan in its relations with the group.

Off the Radar