Media Roundup

United States

Top News

U.S. Approves Sale of Warships to Taiwan

By Aries Poon | The Wall Street Journal

The U.S. approved the sale to Taiwan of four used warships, drawing a swift rebuke from China, which called the move damaging to Chinese security interests.

Sony Hack Leaves U.S. in Quandary on How to Deal With North Korea

By Christi Parsons and Brian Bennett | Los Angeles Times

With U.S. intelligence analysts quietly pointing to North Korea as having a hand in the destructive hack of Sony Pictures Entertainment computers, Obama administration officials scrambled Thursday to consider what, if anything, they should do in response.

Opinion

Jeb, Hillary and the Fog of Uncertainty

By Amir Taheri | Asharq Alawsat

By all accounts, the United States is in need of new leadership capable of providing it with some direction in an age of uncertainty. Led by President Barack Obama into a dense fog of incertitude about its place in the world, the US today vacillates between the perceived comfort of isolation and the very American aspiration to leadership.

The U.S. Needs a Free-Trade Deal With China

By Maurice Greenberg and Fred Bergsten | The Wall Street Journal

The benefits? How about an extra $400 billion in American exports each year, and $100 billion in national income.

The Americas

Top News

Crucial Spy in Cuba Paid a Heavy Cold War Price

By Mark Mazzetti, Michael S. Schmidt and Frances Robles | The New York Times

Rolando Sarraff Trujillo, who was released Wednesday from a Cuban prison where he had been held since 1995, provided information on codes used by Cuban spies.

Opinion

Off the Radar

Long Talks Ahead for Maritime Limits Between U.S., Mexico, Cuba

By Dave Graham/Reuters | The News

Joint talks among the United States, Cuba and Mexico to fix the maritime boundaries of the three countries in the Gulf of Mexico are likely to be complex and stretch beyond 2018, a senior Mexican official said on Wednesday.

Europe

Opinion

Putin’s Bubble Bursts

By Paul Krugman | The New York Times

The global plunge in oil prices and the falling ruble have wreaked havoc on the Russian economy. It’s been quite a comedown for the strongman.

Revenge of the Ruble: What the Crisis Means for Putin

By Daniel Cloud | Foreign Affairs

The ruble has already lost almost half its value against the dollar this year, and there is little doubt that Putin will end up badly wounded. The question is whether he will drag his country down with him, turning Russia into a full-fledged pariah state.

Off the Radar

IMF Withholds Bailout Money for Cyprus

The Associated Press

The International Monetary Fund said Thursday it won’t release $108 million in rescue money for bailed-out Cyprus after the country’s parliament voted to hold a key foreclosure law from taking effect at the end of December.

Africa

Top News

Off the Radar

Kenya President Signs Controversial New Security Law

The Associated Press

Kenya’s president signed into law a contentious bill saying it will help the country fight terrorism, but which critics say will be used to crush dissent by curbing constitutionally guaranteed civil liberties.

Middle East

Top News

Iraqi Kurds Press Fightback as Top Jihadist Reported Killed

By Abdelhamid Zebari | Agence France-Presse

Kurdish forces pressed their biggest offensive against the Islamic State group so far on Friday, buoyed by U.S. reports that jihadist supremo Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’s top aide in Iraq has been killed.

Opinion

Off the Radar

Yemen’s Parliament Approves New Cabinet

By Ahmed al-Haj | The Associated Press

Yemen’s parliament on Thursday approved a new government despite months of violence and political wrangling that has shaken the country.

Asia / Pacific

Top News

Indonesia Wants to Aid U.S. in Islamic State Fight, Top Military Commander Says

By Guy Taylor | The Washington Times

Indonesia’s top military commander said in an interview that the world’s most populous Muslim nation sees the Islamic State movement in Syria and Iraq as a grave threat to the world and that Jakarta wants to increase coordination with Washington to counter the radical group’s rise in Southeast Asia.

Pakistani Military Says It Kills 32 Militants in Ambush

By Jibran Ahmad | Reuters

The Pakistani army said it has killed 59 militants in clashes in the northwest, including 32 in an ambush in a remote valley near the Afghan border, in intensified fighting since this week’s Taliban massacre of children at a school.

Russia Invites North Korean Leader to Moscow for May Visit

Reuters

Russian President Vladimir Putin has invited North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to Moscow next year to mark the 70th anniversary of the Soviet defeat of Nazi Germany in World War Two, the Kremlin’s spokesman said on Friday.

Opinion

Pakistan’s 9/11?

By Ayesha Siddiqa | The New York Times

Terrorism endures because the political and military elites’ attitude toward radical groups is opportunistic.

Pakistan After the Peshawar Massacre

By Shahid Javed Burki | Project Syndicate

The assault on the military school was the single deadliest attack in the Taliban’s history. The question now is whether it will turn out to be a turning point for Pakistan in its relations with the group.

Off the Radar

CERN Nuclear Physics Lab Admits Pakistan

By John Heilprin/AP | The Jakarta Post

The world’s top particle physics lab has admitted Pakistan as an associate member, a year after Israel was voted in as a full member.

Top News

U.S. Approves Sale of Warships to Taiwan

By Aries Poon | The Wall Street Journal

The U.S. approved the sale to Taiwan of four used warships, drawing a swift rebuke from China, which called the move damaging to Chinese security interests.

Sony Hack Leaves U.S. in Quandary on How to Deal With North Korea

By Christi Parsons and Brian Bennett | Los Angeles Times

With U.S. intelligence analysts quietly pointing to North Korea as having a hand in the destructive hack of Sony Pictures Entertainment computers, Obama administration officials scrambled Thursday to consider what, if anything, they should do in response.

Opinion

Jeb, Hillary and the Fog of Uncertainty

By Amir Taheri | Asharq Alawsat

By all accounts, the United States is in need of new leadership capable of providing it with some direction in an age of uncertainty. Led by President Barack Obama into a dense fog of incertitude about its place in the world, the US today vacillates between the perceived comfort of isolation and the very American aspiration to leadership.

The U.S. Needs a Free-Trade Deal With China

By Maurice Greenberg and Fred Bergsten | The Wall Street Journal

The benefits? How about an extra $400 billion in American exports each year, and $100 billion in national income.

Top News

Crucial Spy in Cuba Paid a Heavy Cold War Price

By Mark Mazzetti, Michael S. Schmidt and Frances Robles | The New York Times

Rolando Sarraff Trujillo, who was released Wednesday from a Cuban prison where he had been held since 1995, provided information on codes used by Cuban spies.

Opinion

Off the Radar

Long Talks Ahead for Maritime Limits Between U.S., Mexico, Cuba

By Dave Graham/Reuters | The News

Joint talks among the United States, Cuba and Mexico to fix the maritime boundaries of the three countries in the Gulf of Mexico are likely to be complex and stretch beyond 2018, a senior Mexican official said on Wednesday.

Opinion

Putin’s Bubble Bursts

By Paul Krugman | The New York Times

The global plunge in oil prices and the falling ruble have wreaked havoc on the Russian economy. It’s been quite a comedown for the strongman.

Revenge of the Ruble: What the Crisis Means for Putin

By Daniel Cloud | Foreign Affairs

The ruble has already lost almost half its value against the dollar this year, and there is little doubt that Putin will end up badly wounded. The question is whether he will drag his country down with him, turning Russia into a full-fledged pariah state.

Off the Radar

IMF Withholds Bailout Money for Cyprus

The Associated Press

The International Monetary Fund said Thursday it won’t release $108 million in rescue money for bailed-out Cyprus after the country’s parliament voted to hold a key foreclosure law from taking effect at the end of December.

Top News

Off the Radar

Kenya President Signs Controversial New Security Law

The Associated Press

Kenya’s president signed into law a contentious bill saying it will help the country fight terrorism, but which critics say will be used to crush dissent by curbing constitutionally guaranteed civil liberties.

Top News

Iraqi Kurds Press Fightback as Top Jihadist Reported Killed

By Abdelhamid Zebari | Agence France-Presse

Kurdish forces pressed their biggest offensive against the Islamic State group so far on Friday, buoyed by U.S. reports that jihadist supremo Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi’s top aide in Iraq has been killed.

Opinion

Off the Radar

Yemen’s Parliament Approves New Cabinet

By Ahmed al-Haj | The Associated Press

Yemen’s parliament on Thursday approved a new government despite months of violence and political wrangling that has shaken the country.

Top News

Indonesia Wants to Aid U.S. in Islamic State Fight, Top Military Commander Says

By Guy Taylor | The Washington Times

Indonesia’s top military commander said in an interview that the world’s most populous Muslim nation sees the Islamic State movement in Syria and Iraq as a grave threat to the world and that Jakarta wants to increase coordination with Washington to counter the radical group’s rise in Southeast Asia.

Pakistani Military Says It Kills 32 Militants in Ambush

By Jibran Ahmad | Reuters

The Pakistani army said it has killed 59 militants in clashes in the northwest, including 32 in an ambush in a remote valley near the Afghan border, in intensified fighting since this week’s Taliban massacre of children at a school.

Russia Invites North Korean Leader to Moscow for May Visit

Reuters

Russian President Vladimir Putin has invited North Korean leader Kim Jong Un to Moscow next year to mark the 70th anniversary of the Soviet defeat of Nazi Germany in World War Two, the Kremlin’s spokesman said on Friday.

Opinion

Pakistan’s 9/11?

By Ayesha Siddiqa | The New York Times

Terrorism endures because the political and military elites’ attitude toward radical groups is opportunistic.

Pakistan After the Peshawar Massacre

By Shahid Javed Burki | Project Syndicate

The assault on the military school was the single deadliest attack in the Taliban’s history. The question now is whether it will turn out to be a turning point for Pakistan in its relations with the group.

Off the Radar

CERN Nuclear Physics Lab Admits Pakistan

By John Heilprin/AP | The Jakarta Post

The world’s top particle physics lab has admitted Pakistan as an associate member, a year after Israel was voted in as a full member.