Media Roundup

United States

Top News

Obama Takes in India’s Grand Republic Day Parade

By Julie Pace and Muneeza Naqvi | The Associated Press

President Barack Obama on Monday took in a grand display of Indian military hardware, marching bands and elaborately dressed camels, becoming the first American leader to be honored as chief guest at India’s annual Republic Day festivities.

The Americas

Opinion

Who Killed Alberto Nisman?

By Mary Anastasia O’Grady | The Wall Street Journal

It’s hard to know who had most to gain — and the least to lose—from the death of Argentine federal prosecutor Alberto Nisman. I’d say it’s Iran.

A Very Argentinian Mystery

By Jon Lee Anderson | The New Yorker

On Sunday, January 18th, Natalio Alberto Nisman, a fifty-one-year-old federal prosecutor, was found shot dead inside his locked Buenos Aires apartment. There was a gun nearby, and a bullet wound to his head.

Off the Radar

Europe

Top News

After Victory at Greek Polls, Leftist Politician Forms Coalition Government

By Liz Alderman and Jim Yardley | The New York Times

Alexis Tsipras, the leftist political maverick who swept to power on Sunday in Greece in a popular rebellion, formed a new coalition government on Monday with a right-wing fringe party that will charge immediately into the task of reversing wrenching austerity policies and negotiating with European leaders to reduce Greece’s debt burden.

Opinion

The Death of Ukraine’s Cyborg Army

By James Miller | Foreign Policy

If the United States is really supporting Ukraine, as President Obama claims, then why are Kiev’s forces getting hammered?

Russia Is Turning Into a Rogue State

By Alexander Golts | The Moscow Times

Residents of the village of Martsiyanauka, east of Belarus’ capital Minsk, last week celebrated the end of a pagan winter holiday Kolyada, which over the centuries has merged with Orthodox Christmas celebrations.

How France Will Reform

By Manuel Valls | Project Syndicate

The world is changing rapidly – and it will not wait for anyone. The only way to thrive is to keep pace with this transformation. That is why France is pursuing reforms.

Off the Radar

Africa

Top News

Off the Radar

Senegal Reopens Border With Ebola-Hit Guinea

Anadolu Agency

Senegalese authorities on Monday reopened their country’s border with Guinea five months after it was closed due to fears of the deadly Ebola virus, a Senegalese official has said.

Madagascar Names New Ministers Amid Public Grumbles Over Blackouts

By Lovasoa Rabary | Reuters

Madagascar’s president announced the replacement of eight ministers late on Sunday, including a new finance minister, after the government was dissolved earlier this month amid mounting public frustration over power cuts and other issues.

Previous Media Roundup coverage: Madagascar’s Opposition to Challenge PM’s Appointment in Constitutional Court, Madagascar’s President Names New Prime Minister, Madagascar Government Resigns as Blackouts Roil Country

Middle East

Top News

Activists, Kurds: Islamic State Group Nearly Out of Kobani

By Zeina Karam | The Associated Press

The extremist Islamic State group has nearly been pushed out of the Syrian border town of Kobani, activists and Kurdish officials said Monday, marking a major symbolic victory both for the Kurds and the U.S.-led coalition targeting the militants.

Mubarak Sons Freed From Jail

By Sharaf al-Hourani and Matt Bradley | The Wall Street Journal

The sons of ousted Egyptian autocrat Hosni Mubarak walked free from prison Monday, according to an Egyptian judge, a day after small protests marked the fourth anniversary of the uprising that pushed their father from office and ushered in a period of political instability.

Saudis Expand Regional Power as Others Falter

By David D. Kirkpatrick | The New York Times

The rulers of Saudi Arabia trembled when the Arab Spring revolts broke out four years ago. But far from undermining the Saudi dynasty, the ensuing chaos across the region appears instead to have lifted the monarchy to unrivaled power and influence.

Shiite Militants’ Takeover in Yemen Seen as Big Win for Iran

By Guy Taylor and Tom Howell Jr. | The Washington Times

The surge in Yemen last week by Shiite Muslim militants represents what some national security insiders are calling a “huge victory” for Iran, just as the Obama administration faces criticism for being too lenient in nuclear talks with the Islamic republic and appears — at least tacitly — to be coordinating with Tehran against the Sunni terrorists in Iraq.

Opinion

Sisi Goes to Addis Ababa

By Alex De Waal | The New York Times

Egypt must cooperate with Ethiopia to jointly manage the Nile’s waters.

Interview: Syria’s President Speaks

By Jonathan Tepperman | Foreign Affairs

The civil war in Syria will soon enter its fifth year, with no end in sight. On January 20, Foreign Affairs managing editor Jonathan Tepperman met with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in Damascus to discuss the conflict in this exclusive interview.

Off the Radar

Morocco Arrests Suspected Algerian Member of IS-Linked Group

The Associated Press

Morocco’s Interior Ministry has announced the arrest of an Algerian citizen suspected of belonging to a group linked to the Islamic State militant organization which was responsible for the beheading of a French hiker.

Asia / Pacific

Top News

China’s Leaders Show Listening Ear on Trash But Not Politics

By Louise Watt | The Associated Press

To help sell the public on the need for one of the world’s largest trash incinerators in the mountains in west Beijing, Communist Party officials bused in hundreds of people for special tours. They held talks with residents and handed out questionnaires.

Opinion

China: The Eclipse of the Politburo

By Timothy Heath | The DIplomat

Evidence suggests the Politburo Standing Committee is in decline, while the central party bureaucracy gains more clout.

Top News

Obama Takes in India’s Grand Republic Day Parade

By Julie Pace and Muneeza Naqvi | The Associated Press

President Barack Obama on Monday took in a grand display of Indian military hardware, marching bands and elaborately dressed camels, becoming the first American leader to be honored as chief guest at India’s annual Republic Day festivities.

Opinion

Who Killed Alberto Nisman?

By Mary Anastasia O’Grady | The Wall Street Journal

It’s hard to know who had most to gain — and the least to lose—from the death of Argentine federal prosecutor Alberto Nisman. I’d say it’s Iran.

A Very Argentinian Mystery

By Jon Lee Anderson | The New Yorker

On Sunday, January 18th, Natalio Alberto Nisman, a fifty-one-year-old federal prosecutor, was found shot dead inside his locked Buenos Aires apartment. There was a gun nearby, and a bullet wound to his head.

Off the Radar

Top News

After Victory at Greek Polls, Leftist Politician Forms Coalition Government

By Liz Alderman and Jim Yardley | The New York Times

Alexis Tsipras, the leftist political maverick who swept to power on Sunday in Greece in a popular rebellion, formed a new coalition government on Monday with a right-wing fringe party that will charge immediately into the task of reversing wrenching austerity policies and negotiating with European leaders to reduce Greece’s debt burden.

Opinion

The Death of Ukraine’s Cyborg Army

By James Miller | Foreign Policy

If the United States is really supporting Ukraine, as President Obama claims, then why are Kiev’s forces getting hammered?

Russia Is Turning Into a Rogue State

By Alexander Golts | The Moscow Times

Residents of the village of Martsiyanauka, east of Belarus’ capital Minsk, last week celebrated the end of a pagan winter holiday Kolyada, which over the centuries has merged with Orthodox Christmas celebrations.

How France Will Reform

By Manuel Valls | Project Syndicate

The world is changing rapidly – and it will not wait for anyone. The only way to thrive is to keep pace with this transformation. That is why France is pursuing reforms.

Off the Radar

Top News

Off the Radar

Senegal Reopens Border With Ebola-Hit Guinea

Anadolu Agency

Senegalese authorities on Monday reopened their country’s border with Guinea five months after it was closed due to fears of the deadly Ebola virus, a Senegalese official has said.

Madagascar Names New Ministers Amid Public Grumbles Over Blackouts

By Lovasoa Rabary | Reuters

Madagascar’s president announced the replacement of eight ministers late on Sunday, including a new finance minister, after the government was dissolved earlier this month amid mounting public frustration over power cuts and other issues.

Previous Media Roundup coverage: Madagascar’s Opposition to Challenge PM’s Appointment in Constitutional Court, Madagascar’s President Names New Prime Minister, Madagascar Government Resigns as Blackouts Roil Country

Top News

Activists, Kurds: Islamic State Group Nearly Out of Kobani

By Zeina Karam | The Associated Press

The extremist Islamic State group has nearly been pushed out of the Syrian border town of Kobani, activists and Kurdish officials said Monday, marking a major symbolic victory both for the Kurds and the U.S.-led coalition targeting the militants.

Mubarak Sons Freed From Jail

By Sharaf al-Hourani and Matt Bradley | The Wall Street Journal

The sons of ousted Egyptian autocrat Hosni Mubarak walked free from prison Monday, according to an Egyptian judge, a day after small protests marked the fourth anniversary of the uprising that pushed their father from office and ushered in a period of political instability.

Saudis Expand Regional Power as Others Falter

By David D. Kirkpatrick | The New York Times

The rulers of Saudi Arabia trembled when the Arab Spring revolts broke out four years ago. But far from undermining the Saudi dynasty, the ensuing chaos across the region appears instead to have lifted the monarchy to unrivaled power and influence.

Shiite Militants’ Takeover in Yemen Seen as Big Win for Iran

By Guy Taylor and Tom Howell Jr. | The Washington Times

The surge in Yemen last week by Shiite Muslim militants represents what some national security insiders are calling a “huge victory” for Iran, just as the Obama administration faces criticism for being too lenient in nuclear talks with the Islamic republic and appears — at least tacitly — to be coordinating with Tehran against the Sunni terrorists in Iraq.

Opinion

Sisi Goes to Addis Ababa

By Alex De Waal | The New York Times

Egypt must cooperate with Ethiopia to jointly manage the Nile’s waters.

Interview: Syria’s President Speaks

By Jonathan Tepperman | Foreign Affairs

The civil war in Syria will soon enter its fifth year, with no end in sight. On January 20, Foreign Affairs managing editor Jonathan Tepperman met with Syrian President Bashar al-Assad in Damascus to discuss the conflict in this exclusive interview.

Off the Radar

Morocco Arrests Suspected Algerian Member of IS-Linked Group

The Associated Press

Morocco’s Interior Ministry has announced the arrest of an Algerian citizen suspected of belonging to a group linked to the Islamic State militant organization which was responsible for the beheading of a French hiker.

Top News

China’s Leaders Show Listening Ear on Trash But Not Politics

By Louise Watt | The Associated Press

To help sell the public on the need for one of the world’s largest trash incinerators in the mountains in west Beijing, Communist Party officials bused in hundreds of people for special tours. They held talks with residents and handed out questionnaires.

Opinion

China: The Eclipse of the Politburo

By Timothy Heath | The DIplomat

Evidence suggests the Politburo Standing Committee is in decline, while the central party bureaucracy gains more clout.