Media Roundup

United States

Top News

Syria Airstrikes Spur White House Infighting Over Benefit to Assad

By Guy Taylor | The Washington Times

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel acknowledged for the first time Thursday that the U.S.-led airstrikes against the Islamic State are benefiting Syrian President Bashar Assad — highlighting a strategy that sources close to the White House say was hotly contested by some of President Obama’s national security advisers.

Opinion

Is Gen. John Allen in Over His Head?

By Mark Perry | Foreign Policy

President Obama’s point man in the fight against the Islamic State faces a ruthless foe. But his detractors at home—even in the Pentagon—may be his biggest enemy.

Latin America

Top News

Mexico Police Questioned in Killing of 3 Americans

By Christopher Sherman | The Associated Press

Authorities are investigating a possible police connection to the killing of three U.S. citizens visiting their father in Mexico who were found shot to death along with a Mexican friend more than two weeks after going missing.

Off the Radar

Ecuadorian, Peruvian Presidents Hold Bilateral Meeting

Tele Sur

Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa inaugurated the 8th Binational Cabinet meeting with his Peruvian counterpart Ollanta Humala on Thursday in order to discuss a wide range of issues including defense, trade, security and environmental issues.

Europe

Top News

Romania to Vote For New Leader; Corruption Ignored

By Alison Mutler | The Associated Press

Romanians go to the polls Sunday to elect a new leader as President Traian Basescu steps down after 10 years. Prime Minister Victor Ponta is favored to win over challengers who include a city mayor and a glamorous lawyer.

Opinion

Africa

Top News

Liberia’s Ebola Crisis Puts President in Harsh Light

By Helene Cooper | The New York Times

As Liberia’s first elected leader after a devastating civil war, President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has pushed the country to economic growth, but gains have been halted by the Ebola outbreak.

Burkina Faso Protesters Refuse to Back Down

By Drew Hinshaw | The Wall Street Journal

Tens of thousands of demonstrators swarm capital’s streets demanding President Blaise Compaore step down immediately despite his offer to lead one-year political transition.

Off the Radar

Middle East

Top News

Bombs at Marketplaces Near Baghdad Kill 15 People

By Sameer N. Yacoub | The Associated Press

A series of bomb attacks struck marketplaces near Baghdad on Friday, killing at least 15 people, Iraqi officials said as security forces recaptured parts of a strategic Sunni oil town north of the capital from Islamic State militants.

Opinion

Lessons From Versailles For Today’s Imploding Middle East

By Marc Grossman | The Daily Star

As the Middle East and North Africa implode, perhaps focus should be directed on the end of World War I—and specifically the settlement fashioned by U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, British Prime Minister David Lloyd George and French Prime Minister George Clemenceau at Versailles in 1919.

Why Democracy Took Root in Tunisia and Not Egypt

By Fareed Zakaria | The Washington Post

More than 20 years ago, the scholar Samuel Huntington established his “two-turnover test” for fledgling democracies. A country can be said to be a consolidated democracy, he argued, only when there have been two peaceful transitions of power.

An Iranian Who Could Balance Tehran’s Factions?

By David Ignatius | The Washington Post

An intriguing figure is gaining prominence in the Iranian government just as regional conflicts in Iraq and Syria intensify and nuclear talks with the West move toward a Nov. 24 deadline.

Off the Radar

Turkey’s Erodgan in France

Today's Zaman

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is scheduled to be in Paris for a one-day working visit on Friday.

Asia / Pacific

Top News

Afghan Leader Makes Rare Reference to Taliban

By Christopher Bodeen | The Associated Press

Afghanistan’s new president invited the Taliban to join in a peace process backed by the international community on Friday, in an unusual direct reference to the insurgents who have stepped up attacks aimed at bringing down his month-old government.

China Gets Silence From Hong Kong Tycoons Instead of Vocal Support

By Julie Makinen | Los Angeles Times

With a $32-billion fortune and business interests as diverse as supermarkets and ports, Asia’s richest man, Li Ka-shing, would seem to have little to fret about. But as the Hong Konger told a class of graduating students in the summer at mainland China’s Shantou University, he’s kept up at night by worries over his city’s yawning wealth gap.

Opinion

China’s Imperial President

By Elizabeth C. Economy | Foreign Affairs

Xi Jinping’s reforms are designed to produce a corruption-free, politically cohesive and economically powerful one-party state with global reach: a Singapore on steroids. But there is no guarantee the reforms will be as transformative as the Chinese leader hopes.

APEC Diplomacy Could Help Thaw Chilly Ties

By Yuriko Koike | The Japan Times

Next month’s Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Beijing looks like a high-risk enterprise, as it is not even clear if Chinese President Xi Jinping and South Korean President Park Geun-hye will agree to meet with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

Apologizing to Japan

By Paul Krugman | The Washington Post

Western economists were scathing in their criticisms of Japanese policy, but the slump we fell into isn’t just similar to Japan’s. It’s worse.

Off the Radar

Top News

Syria Airstrikes Spur White House Infighting Over Benefit to Assad

By Guy Taylor | The Washington Times

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel acknowledged for the first time Thursday that the U.S.-led airstrikes against the Islamic State are benefiting Syrian President Bashar Assad — highlighting a strategy that sources close to the White House say was hotly contested by some of President Obama’s national security advisers.

Opinion

Is Gen. John Allen in Over His Head?

By Mark Perry | Foreign Policy

President Obama’s point man in the fight against the Islamic State faces a ruthless foe. But his detractors at home—even in the Pentagon—may be his biggest enemy.

Top News

Mexico Police Questioned in Killing of 3 Americans

By Christopher Sherman | The Associated Press

Authorities are investigating a possible police connection to the killing of three U.S. citizens visiting their father in Mexico who were found shot to death along with a Mexican friend more than two weeks after going missing.

Off the Radar

Ecuadorian, Peruvian Presidents Hold Bilateral Meeting

Tele Sur

Ecuadorian President Rafael Correa inaugurated the 8th Binational Cabinet meeting with his Peruvian counterpart Ollanta Humala on Thursday in order to discuss a wide range of issues including defense, trade, security and environmental issues.

Top News

Romania to Vote For New Leader; Corruption Ignored

By Alison Mutler | The Associated Press

Romanians go to the polls Sunday to elect a new leader as President Traian Basescu steps down after 10 years. Prime Minister Victor Ponta is favored to win over challengers who include a city mayor and a glamorous lawyer.

Opinion

Top News

Liberia’s Ebola Crisis Puts President in Harsh Light

By Helene Cooper | The New York Times

As Liberia’s first elected leader after a devastating civil war, President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has pushed the country to economic growth, but gains have been halted by the Ebola outbreak.

Burkina Faso Protesters Refuse to Back Down

By Drew Hinshaw | The Wall Street Journal

Tens of thousands of demonstrators swarm capital’s streets demanding President Blaise Compaore step down immediately despite his offer to lead one-year political transition.

Off the Radar

Top News

Bombs at Marketplaces Near Baghdad Kill 15 People

By Sameer N. Yacoub | The Associated Press

A series of bomb attacks struck marketplaces near Baghdad on Friday, killing at least 15 people, Iraqi officials said as security forces recaptured parts of a strategic Sunni oil town north of the capital from Islamic State militants.

Opinion

Lessons From Versailles For Today’s Imploding Middle East

By Marc Grossman | The Daily Star

As the Middle East and North Africa implode, perhaps focus should be directed on the end of World War I—and specifically the settlement fashioned by U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, British Prime Minister David Lloyd George and French Prime Minister George Clemenceau at Versailles in 1919.

Why Democracy Took Root in Tunisia and Not Egypt

By Fareed Zakaria | The Washington Post

More than 20 years ago, the scholar Samuel Huntington established his “two-turnover test” for fledgling democracies. A country can be said to be a consolidated democracy, he argued, only when there have been two peaceful transitions of power.

An Iranian Who Could Balance Tehran’s Factions?

By David Ignatius | The Washington Post

An intriguing figure is gaining prominence in the Iranian government just as regional conflicts in Iraq and Syria intensify and nuclear talks with the West move toward a Nov. 24 deadline.

Off the Radar

Turkey’s Erodgan in France

Today's Zaman

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is scheduled to be in Paris for a one-day working visit on Friday.

Top News

Afghan Leader Makes Rare Reference to Taliban

By Christopher Bodeen | The Associated Press

Afghanistan’s new president invited the Taliban to join in a peace process backed by the international community on Friday, in an unusual direct reference to the insurgents who have stepped up attacks aimed at bringing down his month-old government.

China Gets Silence From Hong Kong Tycoons Instead of Vocal Support

By Julie Makinen | Los Angeles Times

With a $32-billion fortune and business interests as diverse as supermarkets and ports, Asia’s richest man, Li Ka-shing, would seem to have little to fret about. But as the Hong Konger told a class of graduating students in the summer at mainland China’s Shantou University, he’s kept up at night by worries over his city’s yawning wealth gap.

Opinion

China’s Imperial President

By Elizabeth C. Economy | Foreign Affairs

Xi Jinping’s reforms are designed to produce a corruption-free, politically cohesive and economically powerful one-party state with global reach: a Singapore on steroids. But there is no guarantee the reforms will be as transformative as the Chinese leader hopes.

APEC Diplomacy Could Help Thaw Chilly Ties

By Yuriko Koike | The Japan Times

Next month’s Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Beijing looks like a high-risk enterprise, as it is not even clear if Chinese President Xi Jinping and South Korean President Park Geun-hye will agree to meet with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.

Apologizing to Japan

By Paul Krugman | The Washington Post

Western economists were scathing in their criticisms of Japanese policy, but the slump we fell into isn’t just similar to Japan’s. It’s worse.

Off the Radar