Media Roundup

United States

Top News

Italy Seeks Info From U.S. in Drone Strike Hostage Death

By Nicole Winfield | The Associated Press

Italy said Friday it wanted more information from the United States about how an Italian aid worker was killed in a U.S. drone strike on the Afghan-Pakistan border as officials sought to explain why it took three months to be told about the “tragic error.”

Cash Flowed to Clinton Foundation Amid Russian Uranium Deal

By Jo Becker and Mike McIntire | The New York Times

The headline on the website Pravda trumpeted President Vladimir V. Putin’s latest coup, its nationalistic fervor recalling an era when its precursor served as the official mouthpiece of the Kremlin: “Russian Nuclear Energy Conquers the World.”

Opinion

The Case for Peace With Iran

By Jeffrey D. Sachs | Project Syndicate

The nuclear framework agreement between Iran and the five permanent U.N. Security Council members plus Germany represents the triumph of rational hope over irrational fear. But now the race is on against hardliners in the U.S., Iran, Israel and elsewhere, who want to kill the deal before the deadline for a final agreement in June.

The U.S. Is Not Being a Good Neighbor

By Richard G. Miles | The Washington Post

Given the Obama administration’s lack of progress in other parts of the world, one might expect it to seize on the obvious opportunities on our nation’s doorsteps. It has not.

The Climate-Change Religion

By Lamar Smith | The Wall Street Journal

Earth Day provided a fresh opening for Obama to raise alarms about global warming based on beliefs, not science.

There Is No Planet B

By Stewart M. Patrick | Council on Foreign Relations

The political will that enables countries to prevent and respond to traditional national security crises must be applied to environmental conservation, writes CFR’s Stewart M. Patrick.

The Americas

Top News

Off the Radar

Honduras High Court Voids Ban on Presidential Re-Election

The Associated Press

The Supreme Court on Thursday voided an article in the constitution limiting presidents to a single term—the issue at the heart of the political conflict that led to the ouster of socialist President Manuel Zelaya six years ago when he sought to hold a referendum on rewriting the constitution.

Month-Long Protest Over Peru Copper Mine Claims First Life

By Franklin Briceno | The Associated Press

Mourners carried a coffin holding a 61-year-old farmer through the streets of a southern Peru port city Thursday after the man became the first fatality of a monthlong protest against a Mexican-owned copper mining project.

Law Will Let Some Foreign Agents Carry Weapons in Mexico

The Associated Press

Mexico’s congress approved on Thursday a reform that lets some foreign agents carry arms inside the country, a significant change in a nation that has historically said the practice would violate its sovereignty.

Europe

Top News

Migrant Deaths: EU Leaders to Triple Funding of Rescue Operations

By Ian Traynor | The Guardian

European leaders have pledged to triple funding of EU maritime operations in the Mediterranean in an attempt to get to grips with the epidemic of migrant drownings at sea, while 15 of 28 EU countries also promised more naval assets for the mission.

Greece Bailout Deal Elusive, ‘Significant’ More Work Needed

The Associated Press

Greece’s finance minister came under fire Friday from his peers in the 19-country eurozone for failing to come up with a comprehensive list of economic reforms that are needed if the country is to get vital loans to avoid going bankrupt.

Opinion

One Hundred Years After Gallipoli

By Steven A. Cook | Foreign Affairs

Steven A. Cook For Gallipoli’s Turkish defenders, the battle was an important victory in defense of the Ottoman Empire. Paradoxically, it also became a touchstone of the nationalism that was so important to the establishment of the Republic of Turkey less than a decade later.

Africa

Opinion

Off the Radar

NATO, Djibouti Boost Counterpiracy Cooperation

defenceWeb

NATO and Djibouti have enhanced their cooperation by agreeing to establish a NATO liaison office in Djibouti in support of the alliance’s counterpiracy operation, Ocean Shield, in the Gulf of Aden.

Middle East

Top News

Asia / Pacific

Top News

Southeast Asian Leaders to Push for South China Sea Code

The Associated Press

Southeast Asian leaders will seek to speed up plans for a binding code of conduct with China governing behavior in the disputed South China Sea at a summit next week, Malaysia’s foreign minister said Friday.

Opinion

Finding Common Ground and Coming to Terms With the Past

By Ozgur Kivanic Altan, Don Slesnick and Dave Prodger | Miami Herald

Every year thousands of Australians and New Zealanders fly halfway around the globe to join the citizens of Turkey in paying tribute to the bravery of their forefathers.

Off the Radar

Chairman of Taiwan’s Ruling Nationalist Party to Visit China

By Christopher Bodeen | The Associated Press

The chairman of Taiwan’s ruling Nationalist party, a likely candidate for the island’s presidency in next year’s election, will meet with Communist Party leaders during a visit to China next month as the former bitter enemies continue their two decade-old rapprochement.

Top News

Italy Seeks Info From U.S. in Drone Strike Hostage Death

By Nicole Winfield | The Associated Press

Italy said Friday it wanted more information from the United States about how an Italian aid worker was killed in a U.S. drone strike on the Afghan-Pakistan border as officials sought to explain why it took three months to be told about the “tragic error.”

Cash Flowed to Clinton Foundation Amid Russian Uranium Deal

By Jo Becker and Mike McIntire | The New York Times

The headline on the website Pravda trumpeted President Vladimir V. Putin’s latest coup, its nationalistic fervor recalling an era when its precursor served as the official mouthpiece of the Kremlin: “Russian Nuclear Energy Conquers the World.”

Opinion

The Case for Peace With Iran

By Jeffrey D. Sachs | Project Syndicate

The nuclear framework agreement between Iran and the five permanent U.N. Security Council members plus Germany represents the triumph of rational hope over irrational fear. But now the race is on against hardliners in the U.S., Iran, Israel and elsewhere, who want to kill the deal before the deadline for a final agreement in June.

The U.S. Is Not Being a Good Neighbor

By Richard G. Miles | The Washington Post

Given the Obama administration’s lack of progress in other parts of the world, one might expect it to seize on the obvious opportunities on our nation’s doorsteps. It has not.

The Climate-Change Religion

By Lamar Smith | The Wall Street Journal

Earth Day provided a fresh opening for Obama to raise alarms about global warming based on beliefs, not science.

There Is No Planet B

By Stewart M. Patrick | Council on Foreign Relations

The political will that enables countries to prevent and respond to traditional national security crises must be applied to environmental conservation, writes CFR’s Stewart M. Patrick.

Top News

Off the Radar

Honduras High Court Voids Ban on Presidential Re-Election

The Associated Press

The Supreme Court on Thursday voided an article in the constitution limiting presidents to a single term—the issue at the heart of the political conflict that led to the ouster of socialist President Manuel Zelaya six years ago when he sought to hold a referendum on rewriting the constitution.

Month-Long Protest Over Peru Copper Mine Claims First Life

By Franklin Briceno | The Associated Press

Mourners carried a coffin holding a 61-year-old farmer through the streets of a southern Peru port city Thursday after the man became the first fatality of a monthlong protest against a Mexican-owned copper mining project.

Law Will Let Some Foreign Agents Carry Weapons in Mexico

The Associated Press

Mexico’s congress approved on Thursday a reform that lets some foreign agents carry arms inside the country, a significant change in a nation that has historically said the practice would violate its sovereignty.

Top News

Migrant Deaths: EU Leaders to Triple Funding of Rescue Operations

By Ian Traynor | The Guardian

European leaders have pledged to triple funding of EU maritime operations in the Mediterranean in an attempt to get to grips with the epidemic of migrant drownings at sea, while 15 of 28 EU countries also promised more naval assets for the mission.

Greece Bailout Deal Elusive, ‘Significant’ More Work Needed

The Associated Press

Greece’s finance minister came under fire Friday from his peers in the 19-country eurozone for failing to come up with a comprehensive list of economic reforms that are needed if the country is to get vital loans to avoid going bankrupt.

Opinion

One Hundred Years After Gallipoli

By Steven A. Cook | Foreign Affairs

Steven A. Cook For Gallipoli’s Turkish defenders, the battle was an important victory in defense of the Ottoman Empire. Paradoxically, it also became a touchstone of the nationalism that was so important to the establishment of the Republic of Turkey less than a decade later.

Opinion

Off the Radar

NATO, Djibouti Boost Counterpiracy Cooperation

defenceWeb

NATO and Djibouti have enhanced their cooperation by agreeing to establish a NATO liaison office in Djibouti in support of the alliance’s counterpiracy operation, Ocean Shield, in the Gulf of Aden.

Top News

Top News

Southeast Asian Leaders to Push for South China Sea Code

The Associated Press

Southeast Asian leaders will seek to speed up plans for a binding code of conduct with China governing behavior in the disputed South China Sea at a summit next week, Malaysia’s foreign minister said Friday.

Opinion

Finding Common Ground and Coming to Terms With the Past

By Ozgur Kivanic Altan, Don Slesnick and Dave Prodger | Miami Herald

Every year thousands of Australians and New Zealanders fly halfway around the globe to join the citizens of Turkey in paying tribute to the bravery of their forefathers.

Off the Radar

Chairman of Taiwan’s Ruling Nationalist Party to Visit China

By Christopher Bodeen | The Associated Press

The chairman of Taiwan’s ruling Nationalist party, a likely candidate for the island’s presidency in next year’s election, will meet with Communist Party leaders during a visit to China next month as the former bitter enemies continue their two decade-old rapprochement.