Media Roundup

United States

Top News

Republicans Subpoena Clinton Emails

Agence France-Presse

Alarm bells sounded earlier this week when it was learned that Hillary Clinton exclusively used a private account for her work emails while serving as President Barack Obama’s top diplomat.

Knife Attack in South Korea May Crimp U.S. Ambassador’s Friendly Style

By Steven Borowiec | Los Angeles Times

Since becoming U.S. ambassador to South Korea last fall, Mark Lippert has been building a reputation as a warm, friendly guy interested in Korean culture—he regularly walks his basset hound, Grigsby, in public and even gave his newborn son a Korean middle name, Sejun.

Opinion

Why Sanctions On Russia Will Backfire

By Samuel Charap and Bernard Sucher | The New York Times

They simply bolster Vladimir Putin’s popularity while undermining those Russians who want to modernize their country.

The Americas

Top News

Opinion

Crude Calculus

By Christopher Sabatini | Foreign Affairs

  • Cheap oil is generating headaches for Latin American countries that bet on high prices. Here’s how Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela are managing the downturn. 

Off the Radar

Brazil’s Navy Launches Biggest Operation in its History

Latin American Herald Tribune

The Brazilian navy announced Wednesday its biggest operation ever, with 15,000 service members, 250 vessels and 10 aircraft deployed to police the country’s lakes, rivers and 5,250 miles of Atlantic coastline.

Europe

Top News

Opinion

Germany Secures New Economic Order

By Guillermo Medina | Asia Times

Approval, particularly by Germany, of the Greek government’s reform commitments gains time while avoiding facing the underlying problems.

Nemtsov Death Ushers In Russia’s New Terror

By Alexander Baunov | Moscow Times

  • Authoritarian regimes come in different shapes and sizes. In some states, the political opposition is deprived of power, influence, and participation in political life through peaceful, non-violent means. In others, the killing of opposition politicians is just a regular occurrence.

Off the Radar

Benelux Countries Sign Air Defense Act

By Eric Maurice | EUobserver

The three Benelux countries, Belgium, Netherlands and Luxembourg, Wednesday agreed to share surveillance and protection of their air spaces, in the first agreement of its kind among EU countries.

Africa

Top News

WHO To Begin Large-Scale Testing of Ebola Vaccine in Guinea

By Maria Cheng | Associated Press

The World Health Organization will start large-scale testing of an experimental Ebola vaccine in Guinea on Saturday to see how effective it might be in preventing future outbreaks of the deadly virus.

Opinion

Zambia’s Uncertain Future

By Vito Laterza and Patience Mususa | Foreign Affairs

  • Zambia is managing a boom in its copper mining industry and is on the verge of repaying its international debts. Political uncertainty following President Michael Sata’s death, however, could unravel the country’s progress.

Middle East

Top News

Libya Says 11 Oil Fields Non-Operational After IS Attacks

By Esam Mohamed | The Associated Press

Libya’s state-run oil corporation has declared 11 oil fields in the country non-operational after attacks by suspected Islamic State militants, opting for a force majeure clause that exempts the state from contractual obligations.

Opinion

Off the Radar

Egyptian Interior Minister Sacked

By Ramadan Al Sherbini | Gulf News

Egyptian Interior Minister Mohammad Ebrahim, criticized by the opposition for alleged police abuses, was sacked on Thursday.

Asia / Pacific

Top News

China Defense Spending to Grow 10.1 Percent in 2015

By Christopher Bodeeen | The Associated Press

China said Thursday it will boost defense spending by 10.1 percent, a smaller rise than last year but in line with large annual increases that have drawn concern among the country’s neighbors over Beijing’s military and territorial ambitions.

Myanmar Cracks Down on Education Protest at Yangon Pagoda

By Aye Aye Win | The Associated Press

Police cracked down on students and other activists opposing Myanmar’s new education law Thursday, charging protesters with batons and dragging them into trucks at a landmark pagoda in the heart of the old capital.

Opinion

An Olive Branch in AfPak

By Tamim Asey | Foreign Policy

  • Afghanistan is trying to retool its rocky relationship with Pakistan. Will this great bargain pay off?

Off the Radar

Japan, China to Hold First Security Talks in Four Years

Reuters

Japanese and Chinese officials will hold their first security talks in four years in Tokyo later this month, Japan’s Foreign Ministry said Thursday, the latest sign of a possible improvement in ties strained by a territorial dispute.

North Korean Foreign Minister to Visit Belarus

BelTA

North Korean Foreign Minister Ri Su-yong is expected to pay an official visit to Belarus on March 8-12, spokesman for the Belarusian Foreign Ministry Dmitry Mironchik told the media today, BelTA has learned.

Top News

Republicans Subpoena Clinton Emails

Agence France-Presse

Alarm bells sounded earlier this week when it was learned that Hillary Clinton exclusively used a private account for her work emails while serving as President Barack Obama’s top diplomat.

Knife Attack in South Korea May Crimp U.S. Ambassador’s Friendly Style

By Steven Borowiec | Los Angeles Times

Since becoming U.S. ambassador to South Korea last fall, Mark Lippert has been building a reputation as a warm, friendly guy interested in Korean culture—he regularly walks his basset hound, Grigsby, in public and even gave his newborn son a Korean middle name, Sejun.

Opinion

Why Sanctions On Russia Will Backfire

By Samuel Charap and Bernard Sucher | The New York Times

They simply bolster Vladimir Putin’s popularity while undermining those Russians who want to modernize their country.

Top News

Opinion

Crude Calculus

By Christopher Sabatini | Foreign Affairs

  • Cheap oil is generating headaches for Latin American countries that bet on high prices. Here’s how Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela are managing the downturn. 

Off the Radar

Brazil’s Navy Launches Biggest Operation in its History

Latin American Herald Tribune

The Brazilian navy announced Wednesday its biggest operation ever, with 15,000 service members, 250 vessels and 10 aircraft deployed to police the country’s lakes, rivers and 5,250 miles of Atlantic coastline.

Top News

Opinion

Germany Secures New Economic Order

By Guillermo Medina | Asia Times

Approval, particularly by Germany, of the Greek government’s reform commitments gains time while avoiding facing the underlying problems.

Nemtsov Death Ushers In Russia’s New Terror

By Alexander Baunov | Moscow Times

  • Authoritarian regimes come in different shapes and sizes. In some states, the political opposition is deprived of power, influence, and participation in political life through peaceful, non-violent means. In others, the killing of opposition politicians is just a regular occurrence.

Off the Radar

Benelux Countries Sign Air Defense Act

By Eric Maurice | EUobserver

The three Benelux countries, Belgium, Netherlands and Luxembourg, Wednesday agreed to share surveillance and protection of their air spaces, in the first agreement of its kind among EU countries.

Top News

WHO To Begin Large-Scale Testing of Ebola Vaccine in Guinea

By Maria Cheng | Associated Press

The World Health Organization will start large-scale testing of an experimental Ebola vaccine in Guinea on Saturday to see how effective it might be in preventing future outbreaks of the deadly virus.

Opinion

Zambia’s Uncertain Future

By Vito Laterza and Patience Mususa | Foreign Affairs

  • Zambia is managing a boom in its copper mining industry and is on the verge of repaying its international debts. Political uncertainty following President Michael Sata’s death, however, could unravel the country’s progress.

Top News

Libya Says 11 Oil Fields Non-Operational After IS Attacks

By Esam Mohamed | The Associated Press

Libya’s state-run oil corporation has declared 11 oil fields in the country non-operational after attacks by suspected Islamic State militants, opting for a force majeure clause that exempts the state from contractual obligations.

Opinion

Off the Radar

Egyptian Interior Minister Sacked

By Ramadan Al Sherbini | Gulf News

Egyptian Interior Minister Mohammad Ebrahim, criticized by the opposition for alleged police abuses, was sacked on Thursday.

Top News

China Defense Spending to Grow 10.1 Percent in 2015

By Christopher Bodeeen | The Associated Press

China said Thursday it will boost defense spending by 10.1 percent, a smaller rise than last year but in line with large annual increases that have drawn concern among the country’s neighbors over Beijing’s military and territorial ambitions.

Myanmar Cracks Down on Education Protest at Yangon Pagoda

By Aye Aye Win | The Associated Press

Police cracked down on students and other activists opposing Myanmar’s new education law Thursday, charging protesters with batons and dragging them into trucks at a landmark pagoda in the heart of the old capital.

Opinion

An Olive Branch in AfPak

By Tamim Asey | Foreign Policy

  • Afghanistan is trying to retool its rocky relationship with Pakistan. Will this great bargain pay off?

Off the Radar

Japan, China to Hold First Security Talks in Four Years

Reuters

Japanese and Chinese officials will hold their first security talks in four years in Tokyo later this month, Japan’s Foreign Ministry said Thursday, the latest sign of a possible improvement in ties strained by a territorial dispute.

North Korean Foreign Minister to Visit Belarus

BelTA

North Korean Foreign Minister Ri Su-yong is expected to pay an official visit to Belarus on March 8-12, spokesman for the Belarusian Foreign Ministry Dmitry Mironchik told the media today, BelTA has learned.