Media Roundup

United States

Top News

Canadians Seek to Understand Parliament Shooting

By Rachel La Corte and Jennifer Peltz | The Associated Press

Government leaders gathered in a show of resolution a day after a deadly attack on Canada’s Parliament, as authorities and everyday Canadians sifted through confounding shards of the gunman’s life seeking to understand what motivated the man to storm the nation’s seat of power.

U.S. Bid to Prosecute Syrian Officials Slows

By Jess Bravin And Adam Entous | The Wall Street Journal

A U.S. review of thousands of postmortem photographs allegedly showing systematic torture in Syrian prisons has tentatively identified only a handful of victims, none of them Americans, frustrating hopes of prosecuting regime officials in federal court, U.S. officials say.

Doctor in New York City Is Sick With Ebola

By Marc Santora | The New York Times

A doctor in New York City who recently returned from treating Ebola patients in Guinea became the first person in the city to test positive for the virus Thursday, setting off a search for anyone who might have come into contact with him.

U.S., Allies Scramble Jets Almost Daily to Repel Russian Incursions

By Guy Taylor and Maggie Ybarra | The Washington Times

Russian military provocations have increased so much over the seven months since Moscow annexed Crimea from Ukraine that Washington and its allies are scrambling defense assets on a nearly daily basis in response to air, sea and land incursions by Vladimir Putin’s forces.

Opinion

Iraq and the U.S. Are Losing Ground to the Islamic State

By David Ignatius | The Washington Post

Jalal al-Gaood, one of the tribal leaders the United States has been cultivating in hopes of rolling back extremists in Iraq, grimly describes how his home town in Anbar province was forced this week to surrender to fighters from the Islamic State.

The Homegrown Jihadist Threat Grows

By Joseph Lieberman and Christian Beckner | The Wall Street Journal

ISIS’s online recruitment is reaching into North America, yet the Obama administration still has no strategy to fight it.

Latin America

Opinion

Off the Radar

Europe

Top News

Poland’s Tusk Denies Claim on Partition Offer

By Vanessa Gera | The Associated Press

That claim was made by former Foreign Minister Radek Sikorski in an interview with Politico published Sunday. It sparked a huge outcry in Poland, and Sikorski almost immediately backed away from the allegations, saying his memory had failed him.

Opinion

Is Russia Heading for a New 1998 Crisis?

By Robert Person | The Moscow Times

Given the plummeting value of the ruble, Russia must avoid the vicious circle that it entered during the crisis of 1998, and can learn important lessons from past mistakes.

The Zombie System: How Capitalism Has Gone Off the Rails

By Michael Sauga | Der Spiegel

Six years after the Lehman disaster, the industrialized world is suffering from Japan Syndrome. Growth is minimal, another crash may be brewing and the gulf between rich and poor continues to widen. Can the global economy reinvent itself?

Africa

Top News

Nigeria: A Nation Divided

The Economist

Africa’s lodestar nation has weathered Ebola, but an extremist takeover has exposed the flaw at its heart.

Opinion

The Right Aid in Ebola Crisis

By Larry Ronan and Craig Vanderwagen | The Boston Globe

The global disaster responses in Haiti and Indonesia provide lessons for dealing with this epidemic.

Off the Radar

China, Tanzania Carrying Out Month-Long Joint Naval Drills

By Oscar Nkala | defenceWeb

The Chinese People Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) and the naval wing of the Tanzania People’s Defence Force (TPDFA) are carrying out a month-long joint naval training exercise off the Indian Ocean coast as the two countries extend their long-standing defense and military training partnership to the naval domain.

Tanzania to Vote on New Constitution

By AFP | News24

Tanzania will hold a referendum in April 2015 on a new constitution, the government has announced, a move rejected by the opposition, who said Thursday that the drafting process ignored it.

Middle East

Top News

A Mysterious Oil Tanker Might Hold the Key to Kurdish Independence

By Matthew Philips | Bloomberg Businessweek

At any given time, the Gulf of Mexico is crawling with oil tankers, many of them delivering some of the 7.5 million barrels of foreign crude the U.S. imports each day. On July 23 a Greek-owned oil tanker named the United Kalavryta came around the tip of Florida and into the Gulf.

Opinion

More Small Wars: Counterinsurgency Is Here to Stay?

By Max Boot | Foreign Affairs

Washington doesn’t have the luxury of simply avoiding insurgencies, so it needs to figure out how to fight them better. Drawn from more than a decade of war, here are ten lessons for doing so.

Off the Radar

Asia / Pacific

Top News

N. Korea Signals U.S. Must Apologize to Free Detainees

By Eric Talmadge | The Associated Press

After an American was released from North Korean custody, the attention has now focused on two other U.S. citizens still in its jails, and at least one North Korean legal expert has some unusual advice to offer: let Washington formally apologize to Pyongyang, and the country’s leader will consider pardoning them.

Protesters in HK to Vote on Staying in Streets

The Associated Press

Pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong plan to hold a spot referendum Sunday on whether to stay in the streets or accept government offers for more talks and clear their protest camps.

China, 20 Other Countries Initiate New Asian Bank

By Christopher Bodeen | The Associated Press

Twenty-one Asian nations have signed on to a China-driven initiative to create a new development bank for Asia that’s aimed at boosting infrastructure investment of all kinds. Beijing sees that as a way to raise its international standing, but Washington opposes the move as an unnecessary and potentially damaging rival to established institutions such as the World Bank.

Opinion

Pyongyang Using Live Bait to Lure Washington

By James Gibney | The Japan Times

For new talks to succeed with North Korea, the U.S. must expend more energy getting South Korea and Japan, barely on speaking terms, to get along, and end its policy of doing nothing while the North becomes more dangerous.

Off the Radar

Vietnam PM to Visit India

Viet Nam News

Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung and his wife will visit India from Oct. 27 to 29, according to the Foreign Ministry.

Top News

Canadians Seek to Understand Parliament Shooting

By Rachel La Corte and Jennifer Peltz | The Associated Press

Government leaders gathered in a show of resolution a day after a deadly attack on Canada’s Parliament, as authorities and everyday Canadians sifted through confounding shards of the gunman’s life seeking to understand what motivated the man to storm the nation’s seat of power.

U.S. Bid to Prosecute Syrian Officials Slows

By Jess Bravin And Adam Entous | The Wall Street Journal

A U.S. review of thousands of postmortem photographs allegedly showing systematic torture in Syrian prisons has tentatively identified only a handful of victims, none of them Americans, frustrating hopes of prosecuting regime officials in federal court, U.S. officials say.

Doctor in New York City Is Sick With Ebola

By Marc Santora | The New York Times

A doctor in New York City who recently returned from treating Ebola patients in Guinea became the first person in the city to test positive for the virus Thursday, setting off a search for anyone who might have come into contact with him.

U.S., Allies Scramble Jets Almost Daily to Repel Russian Incursions

By Guy Taylor and Maggie Ybarra | The Washington Times

Russian military provocations have increased so much over the seven months since Moscow annexed Crimea from Ukraine that Washington and its allies are scrambling defense assets on a nearly daily basis in response to air, sea and land incursions by Vladimir Putin’s forces.

Opinion

Iraq and the U.S. Are Losing Ground to the Islamic State

By David Ignatius | The Washington Post

Jalal al-Gaood, one of the tribal leaders the United States has been cultivating in hopes of rolling back extremists in Iraq, grimly describes how his home town in Anbar province was forced this week to surrender to fighters from the Islamic State.

The Homegrown Jihadist Threat Grows

By Joseph Lieberman and Christian Beckner | The Wall Street Journal

ISIS’s online recruitment is reaching into North America, yet the Obama administration still has no strategy to fight it.

Opinion

Off the Radar

Top News

Poland’s Tusk Denies Claim on Partition Offer

By Vanessa Gera | The Associated Press

That claim was made by former Foreign Minister Radek Sikorski in an interview with Politico published Sunday. It sparked a huge outcry in Poland, and Sikorski almost immediately backed away from the allegations, saying his memory had failed him.

Opinion

Is Russia Heading for a New 1998 Crisis?

By Robert Person | The Moscow Times

Given the plummeting value of the ruble, Russia must avoid the vicious circle that it entered during the crisis of 1998, and can learn important lessons from past mistakes.

The Zombie System: How Capitalism Has Gone Off the Rails

By Michael Sauga | Der Spiegel

Six years after the Lehman disaster, the industrialized world is suffering from Japan Syndrome. Growth is minimal, another crash may be brewing and the gulf between rich and poor continues to widen. Can the global economy reinvent itself?

Top News

Nigeria: A Nation Divided

The Economist

Africa’s lodestar nation has weathered Ebola, but an extremist takeover has exposed the flaw at its heart.

Opinion

The Right Aid in Ebola Crisis

By Larry Ronan and Craig Vanderwagen | The Boston Globe

The global disaster responses in Haiti and Indonesia provide lessons for dealing with this epidemic.

Off the Radar

China, Tanzania Carrying Out Month-Long Joint Naval Drills

By Oscar Nkala | defenceWeb

The Chinese People Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) and the naval wing of the Tanzania People’s Defence Force (TPDFA) are carrying out a month-long joint naval training exercise off the Indian Ocean coast as the two countries extend their long-standing defense and military training partnership to the naval domain.

Tanzania to Vote on New Constitution

By AFP | News24

Tanzania will hold a referendum in April 2015 on a new constitution, the government has announced, a move rejected by the opposition, who said Thursday that the drafting process ignored it.

Top News

A Mysterious Oil Tanker Might Hold the Key to Kurdish Independence

By Matthew Philips | Bloomberg Businessweek

At any given time, the Gulf of Mexico is crawling with oil tankers, many of them delivering some of the 7.5 million barrels of foreign crude the U.S. imports each day. On July 23 a Greek-owned oil tanker named the United Kalavryta came around the tip of Florida and into the Gulf.

Opinion

More Small Wars: Counterinsurgency Is Here to Stay?

By Max Boot | Foreign Affairs

Washington doesn’t have the luxury of simply avoiding insurgencies, so it needs to figure out how to fight them better. Drawn from more than a decade of war, here are ten lessons for doing so.

Off the Radar

Top News

N. Korea Signals U.S. Must Apologize to Free Detainees

By Eric Talmadge | The Associated Press

After an American was released from North Korean custody, the attention has now focused on two other U.S. citizens still in its jails, and at least one North Korean legal expert has some unusual advice to offer: let Washington formally apologize to Pyongyang, and the country’s leader will consider pardoning them.

Protesters in HK to Vote on Staying in Streets

The Associated Press

Pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong plan to hold a spot referendum Sunday on whether to stay in the streets or accept government offers for more talks and clear their protest camps.

China, 20 Other Countries Initiate New Asian Bank

By Christopher Bodeen | The Associated Press

Twenty-one Asian nations have signed on to a China-driven initiative to create a new development bank for Asia that’s aimed at boosting infrastructure investment of all kinds. Beijing sees that as a way to raise its international standing, but Washington opposes the move as an unnecessary and potentially damaging rival to established institutions such as the World Bank.

Opinion

Pyongyang Using Live Bait to Lure Washington

By James Gibney | The Japan Times

For new talks to succeed with North Korea, the U.S. must expend more energy getting South Korea and Japan, barely on speaking terms, to get along, and end its policy of doing nothing while the North becomes more dangerous.

Off the Radar

Vietnam PM to Visit India

Viet Nam News

Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung and his wife will visit India from Oct. 27 to 29, according to the Foreign Ministry.