Media Roundup

United States

Top News

U.S. and Turkey Still Not in Sync on Syria

By Deb Riechmann | The Associated Press

Vice President Joe Biden on Friday will become the latest in a parade of U.S. officials trying to push Turkey to step up its role in the international coalition’s fight against Islamic State extremists.

Obama’s Immigration Plan Sparks Firestorm

By Laura Meckler, Colleen McCain Nelson and Eric Morath | The Wall Street Journal

President Obama announced that millions of illegal immigrants will gain protections from deportation under a plan that would bypass Congress and unleashing unpredictable political and economic forces.

Opinion

Latin America

Top News

Clashes Erupt Over Missing Mexican Students

By Randal C. Archibold | The New York Times

Relatives of the 43 missing students led thousands through Mexico City in mostly peaceful marches that ended in clashes between some protesters and the police.

Opinion

Mexico’s Undead Rise Up

By Charlotte María Sáenz | Foreign Policy in Focus

With 43 disappeared student teachers presumed dead, Mexican popular resistance is creating new alternatives to the militarized narco-state.

Colombia’s Data-Driven Fight Against Crime

By Tina Rosenberg | The New York Times

What Mayor Rodrigo Guerrero did to make Cali, Colombia, safer was remarkable because it worked, and because of the novelty of his strategy.

Europe

Top News

Spain’s Surging Podemos Party Rushes to Get to the Top

By Tobias Buck | Financial Times

The faculty of political sciences at Complutense University of Madrid makes no secret of its ideological leanings. Its long, red-brick corridors are covered with anti-capitalist slogans, strike appeals and stickers bearing the Communist hammer and sickle.

Greece, Turkey at Odds Over Fuel Reserves in Mediterranean

By Anthee Carassava | Los Angeles Times

About 20 years ago, a blip in the centuries of bad blood between them, NATO allies Greece and Turkey came to the brink of war over conflicting claims to an arid Aegean isle inhabited solely by goats, rabbits and sheep.

Opinion

Russia’s Neglected Human Rights Activists

By Susanne Berger and Arne Ruth | The Moscow Times

Human rights activists are facing persecution and harassment around the world, especially in Russia, and the West needs to stop looking the other way.

Off the Radar

3rd New Nuclear Missile Submarine Set to Join Russian Navy

The Moscow Times

Amid a buildup of Moscow’s naval power, the Russian Navy is set to commission its third brand new Borei class nuclear missile submarine, the K-551 Vladimir Monomakh, a senior Defense Ministry source was quoted as saying by the TASS news agency Friday.

Africa

Top News

Tunisia Heats Up Ahead of Presidential Election

By Bouazza Ben Bouazza | The Associated Press

Tunisia’s first free presidential election is boiling down to two candidates with divergent views of the revolution that transformed this former dictatorship.

Gambia Leader Approves Law Jailing Gays for Life

The Associated Press

The president of Gambia has signed a bill into law that calls for life imprisonment for some homosexual acts, the latest African country to codify harsh penalties for the gay community.

Opinion

Off the Radar

Zambia’s President Scott Suspended as Ruling Party Leader

By Chris Mfula | Reuters

Zambia’s ruling Patriotic Front (PF) said Friday it had suspended President Guy Scott as acting head of the party for “unconstitutional conduct,” in the latest twist of a bitter power struggle ahead of a January election.

Mali, Rebels Start Third Round of Peace Talks

By Reuters | defenceWeb

Mali began a third round of peace negotiations with mostly Tuareg rebel groups in Algiers on Thursday aimed at ending decades of uprisings in the north, with the government calling for a swift conclusion of a deal.

Cote d’Ivoire Soldiers End Protests After Government Concessions

By Reuters | defenceWeb

Disgruntled former rebels now serving in Cote d’Ivoire’s army have agreed to end a protest over back pay and overdue benefits, they said Thursday, following two days of talks with government ministers and a meeting with the president.

Previous Media Roundup coverage: Cote d’Ivoire Opens Talks With Disgruntled Soldiers Protesting Soldiers in Cote d’Ivoire Return to Barracks, Await Talks, Cote d’Ivoire Soldiers Protest Over Benefits, Bonuses

Middle East

Top News

Kerry and Zarif Leave Nuclear Talks, Returns Unclear

By George Jahn and Matthew Lee | The Associated Press

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Iran’s foreign minister decided Friday to pull back from nuclear talks in Vienna, leaving the future of the negotiations unclear less than four days before the deadline for a deal.

Opinion

Syria Goes Back to Old Colonial Games

By Amir Taheri | Asharq Alawsat

It was, perhaps, sometime last year that whoever runs the Assad regime in Damascus discovered a colonial-era manual left by the French on how to hang on to power in Syria.

The Myth of the Caliphate

By Nick Danforth | Foreign Affairs

Western pundits and nostalgic Muslim thinkers alike have built up a narrative of the caliphate as an enduring institution, central to Islam and Islamic thought between the seventh and twentieth centuries.

Off the Radar

Africa-Turkey Summit to Issue Five-Year Roadmap

World Bulletin

Leaders of African countries and Turkey met Friday in the seaside city of Malabo, the capital of Equatorial Guinea, to review the performance of the 1st Africa-Turkey partnership and to endorse priority area projects for the next five years.

Asia / Pacific

Top News

Sri Lanka Leader to Face Health Minister in Polls

By Bharatha Mallawarchi | The Associated Press

Sri Lanka’s health minister quit President Mahinda Rajapaksa’s government Friday to challenge him in the upcoming elections, accusing the leader of taking the country toward an autocracy.

Opinion

China and the Climate Pact Swindle

By Charles Krauthammer | The Washington Post

Historic. Such is the ubiquitous description of the climate agreement recently announced in Beijing between Barack Obama and Xi Jinping in which China promised for the first time to cap carbon emissions.

Off the Radar

Mongolia Gets New Prime Minister as Economy Slumps

Reuters

Mongolia’s parliament has appointed Chimed Saikhanbileg as prime minister, it said on Friday, more than two weeks after it ousted his predecessor for failing to get to grips with a slumping economy and foreign investment.

Indian Navy Warship Visiting Mozambique

defenceWeb

Fresh from participating in Exercise Ibsamar in South African waters, the Indian Naval Ship Teg is currently on a goodwill visit to Mozambique.

Top News

U.S. and Turkey Still Not in Sync on Syria

By Deb Riechmann | The Associated Press

Vice President Joe Biden on Friday will become the latest in a parade of U.S. officials trying to push Turkey to step up its role in the international coalition’s fight against Islamic State extremists.

Obama’s Immigration Plan Sparks Firestorm

By Laura Meckler, Colleen McCain Nelson and Eric Morath | The Wall Street Journal

President Obama announced that millions of illegal immigrants will gain protections from deportation under a plan that would bypass Congress and unleashing unpredictable political and economic forces.

Opinion

Top News

Clashes Erupt Over Missing Mexican Students

By Randal C. Archibold | The New York Times

Relatives of the 43 missing students led thousands through Mexico City in mostly peaceful marches that ended in clashes between some protesters and the police.

Opinion

Mexico’s Undead Rise Up

By Charlotte María Sáenz | Foreign Policy in Focus

With 43 disappeared student teachers presumed dead, Mexican popular resistance is creating new alternatives to the militarized narco-state.

Colombia’s Data-Driven Fight Against Crime

By Tina Rosenberg | The New York Times

What Mayor Rodrigo Guerrero did to make Cali, Colombia, safer was remarkable because it worked, and because of the novelty of his strategy.

Top News

Spain’s Surging Podemos Party Rushes to Get to the Top

By Tobias Buck | Financial Times

The faculty of political sciences at Complutense University of Madrid makes no secret of its ideological leanings. Its long, red-brick corridors are covered with anti-capitalist slogans, strike appeals and stickers bearing the Communist hammer and sickle.

Greece, Turkey at Odds Over Fuel Reserves in Mediterranean

By Anthee Carassava | Los Angeles Times

About 20 years ago, a blip in the centuries of bad blood between them, NATO allies Greece and Turkey came to the brink of war over conflicting claims to an arid Aegean isle inhabited solely by goats, rabbits and sheep.

Opinion

Russia’s Neglected Human Rights Activists

By Susanne Berger and Arne Ruth | The Moscow Times

Human rights activists are facing persecution and harassment around the world, especially in Russia, and the West needs to stop looking the other way.

Off the Radar

3rd New Nuclear Missile Submarine Set to Join Russian Navy

The Moscow Times

Amid a buildup of Moscow’s naval power, the Russian Navy is set to commission its third brand new Borei class nuclear missile submarine, the K-551 Vladimir Monomakh, a senior Defense Ministry source was quoted as saying by the TASS news agency Friday.

Top News

Tunisia Heats Up Ahead of Presidential Election

By Bouazza Ben Bouazza | The Associated Press

Tunisia’s first free presidential election is boiling down to two candidates with divergent views of the revolution that transformed this former dictatorship.

Gambia Leader Approves Law Jailing Gays for Life

The Associated Press

The president of Gambia has signed a bill into law that calls for life imprisonment for some homosexual acts, the latest African country to codify harsh penalties for the gay community.

Opinion

Off the Radar

Zambia’s President Scott Suspended as Ruling Party Leader

By Chris Mfula | Reuters

Zambia’s ruling Patriotic Front (PF) said Friday it had suspended President Guy Scott as acting head of the party for “unconstitutional conduct,” in the latest twist of a bitter power struggle ahead of a January election.

Mali, Rebels Start Third Round of Peace Talks

By Reuters | defenceWeb

Mali began a third round of peace negotiations with mostly Tuareg rebel groups in Algiers on Thursday aimed at ending decades of uprisings in the north, with the government calling for a swift conclusion of a deal.

Cote d’Ivoire Soldiers End Protests After Government Concessions

By Reuters | defenceWeb

Disgruntled former rebels now serving in Cote d’Ivoire’s army have agreed to end a protest over back pay and overdue benefits, they said Thursday, following two days of talks with government ministers and a meeting with the president.

Previous Media Roundup coverage: Cote d’Ivoire Opens Talks With Disgruntled Soldiers Protesting Soldiers in Cote d’Ivoire Return to Barracks, Await Talks, Cote d’Ivoire Soldiers Protest Over Benefits, Bonuses

Top News

Kerry and Zarif Leave Nuclear Talks, Returns Unclear

By George Jahn and Matthew Lee | The Associated Press

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Iran’s foreign minister decided Friday to pull back from nuclear talks in Vienna, leaving the future of the negotiations unclear less than four days before the deadline for a deal.

Opinion

Syria Goes Back to Old Colonial Games

By Amir Taheri | Asharq Alawsat

It was, perhaps, sometime last year that whoever runs the Assad regime in Damascus discovered a colonial-era manual left by the French on how to hang on to power in Syria.

The Myth of the Caliphate

By Nick Danforth | Foreign Affairs

Western pundits and nostalgic Muslim thinkers alike have built up a narrative of the caliphate as an enduring institution, central to Islam and Islamic thought between the seventh and twentieth centuries.

Off the Radar

Africa-Turkey Summit to Issue Five-Year Roadmap

World Bulletin

Leaders of African countries and Turkey met Friday in the seaside city of Malabo, the capital of Equatorial Guinea, to review the performance of the 1st Africa-Turkey partnership and to endorse priority area projects for the next five years.

Top News

Sri Lanka Leader to Face Health Minister in Polls

By Bharatha Mallawarchi | The Associated Press

Sri Lanka’s health minister quit President Mahinda Rajapaksa’s government Friday to challenge him in the upcoming elections, accusing the leader of taking the country toward an autocracy.

Opinion

China and the Climate Pact Swindle

By Charles Krauthammer | The Washington Post

Historic. Such is the ubiquitous description of the climate agreement recently announced in Beijing between Barack Obama and Xi Jinping in which China promised for the first time to cap carbon emissions.

Off the Radar

Mongolia Gets New Prime Minister as Economy Slumps

Reuters

Mongolia’s parliament has appointed Chimed Saikhanbileg as prime minister, it said on Friday, more than two weeks after it ousted his predecessor for failing to get to grips with a slumping economy and foreign investment.

Indian Navy Warship Visiting Mozambique

defenceWeb

Fresh from participating in Exercise Ibsamar in South African waters, the Indian Naval Ship Teg is currently on a goodwill visit to Mozambique.