Media Roundup

United States

Top News

U.S. Sees Long Alliance With Turkey Crumble

By Liz Sly | The Washington Post

The divergence of views between the two countries over how to handle the Islamic State threat in Syria has laid bare the fault lines of an increasingly fragile, but still strategically vital, diplomatic relationship.

American Reporter’s Family Urges Iran to Release Him

By Adam Schreck | The Associated Press

The family of an Iranian-American correspondent for the Washington Post who has been jailed in Iran since July is urging authorities to release him, saying on Thursday that his continued incarceration without charge is a “farce.”

U.S. National Security Adviser Says Iraq to Blame for Lack of Security After 2011

By Guy Taylor | The Washington Times

One of President Obama’s top national security advisers defended the administration’s strategy for fighting the Islamic State on Wednesday and said it was the fault of the Iraqi government and people — not the White House — that no U.S. troops were left in the country to help with security after the 2011 pullout of American forces.

Opinion

The Era of Disorder

By Richard N. Haass | Council on Foreign Relations

The post–Cold War era of American preeminence has ended, ushering in a far less orderly and peaceful epoch.

Off the Radar

U.S. Participating in Regional Ebola Forum in Cuba

Latin American Herald Tribune

More than 250 officials and specialists from 32 Western Hemisphere countries, including the United States, are participating in a regional technical forum in this capital to exchange information about strategies to fight Ebola and coordinate efforts to prevent the spread of the virus to the region.

Latin America

Top News

Mexico President, Missing Students’ Relatives at Odds After Meeting

By Tracy Wilkinson | Los Angeles Times

More than a month after 43 college students were led away by police and never seen again, Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto on Wednesday met with relatives of the missing men in a bid to shore up flagging public faith in the search.

Opinion

A Call For Authentic Democracy in Mexico

By John M. Ackerman | Los Angeles Times

There is finally a message of hope coming from south of the border. A powerful new social movement has emerged that could radically transform Mexico’s corrupt political system.

Off the Radar

Colombia Senate Approves Controversial Military Justice Reform

By Joel Gillin | Colombia Reports

Colombia’s Senate approved a controversial bill Wednesday that would give military courts greater jurisdiction and could increase impunity for the already slow-moving convictions of military atrocities, according to local media.

Europe

Top News

More Than 50 Countries Sign Tax Deal

By Harriet Torry | The Wall Street Journal

Officials from more than 50 countries signed an agreement they said marks a decisive step in combating tax evasion, a top priority for austerity-hit countries in Europe as they seek to fill depleted state coffers.

Ukraine Gas Supplies in Doubt as Russia Seeks EU Payment Deal

By Alastair Macdonald | Reuters

Ukraine’s efforts to unblock deliveries of Russian gas as winter sets in were deadlocked on Thursday as Moscow’s negotiators were quoted demanding firmer commitments from the European Union to cover Kiev’s pre-payments for energy.

Opinion

Putin Is Living in the Past

By Ivan Sukhov | The Moscow Times

Putin’s speech at Vladai illustrated that he is getting further and further out of touch with the rest of the world.

NATO: Rebellion in the Ranks?

By John Feffer | Foreign Policy in Focus

The countries of the former Warsaw Pact are not knuckling under to pressure from Russia. They’re trying to avoid a new cold war.

How the West Broke Its Promise to Moscow

By Joshua R. Itzkowitz Shifrinson | Foreign Affairs

Russian leaders often claim that the United States reneged on a promise not to expand NATO after the Cold War. They aren’t lying: although Washington never put a pledge in writing, U.S. officials worked hard to convince Moscow that NATO wouldn’t move east. And in international politics, informal commitments count.

Off the Radar

Africa

Top News

Burkina Faso Parliament Set Ablaze

BBC

Protesters angry at plans to allow Burkina Faso’s President Blaise Compaore to extend his 27-year-rule have set fire to parliament.

Opinion

Don’t Let Ebola Dehumanize Africa

By Angelique Kidjo | The New York Times

Fear-mongering about the disease is threatening to reverse decades of progress for the continent’s image.

Middle East

Top News

Peshmerga Troops Start Entering Syrian Border Town

By Elena Becatoros | The Associated Press

Ten Iraqi peshmerga fighters entered a northern Syrian border town, crossing over from Turkey on Thursday, the first from among a group of 150 Kurdish troops on their way into the embattled Kobani, activists said.

Opinion

Asia / Pacific

Top News

Activists: Myanmar Clinging to Political Prisoners

By Robin McDowell and Matthew Pennington | The Associated Press

Myanmar has freed more than a thousand political prisoners since former military rulers handed over power three years ago, a move that has smoothed the former pariah state’s international rehabilitation. Now the government says the job is done. Human rights activists and the U.S. say, not so fast.

Drone Strike Kills 2 Militants in NW Pakistan

By Ishtiaq Mahsud | The Associated Press

Suspected U.S. drone-fired missiles struck a house early on Thursday in a restive tribal region in northwest Pakistan, killing two militants, officials said.

Off the Radar

Top News

U.S. Sees Long Alliance With Turkey Crumble

By Liz Sly | The Washington Post

The divergence of views between the two countries over how to handle the Islamic State threat in Syria has laid bare the fault lines of an increasingly fragile, but still strategically vital, diplomatic relationship.

American Reporter’s Family Urges Iran to Release Him

By Adam Schreck | The Associated Press

The family of an Iranian-American correspondent for the Washington Post who has been jailed in Iran since July is urging authorities to release him, saying on Thursday that his continued incarceration without charge is a “farce.”

U.S. National Security Adviser Says Iraq to Blame for Lack of Security After 2011

By Guy Taylor | The Washington Times

One of President Obama’s top national security advisers defended the administration’s strategy for fighting the Islamic State on Wednesday and said it was the fault of the Iraqi government and people — not the White House — that no U.S. troops were left in the country to help with security after the 2011 pullout of American forces.

Opinion

The Era of Disorder

By Richard N. Haass | Council on Foreign Relations

The post–Cold War era of American preeminence has ended, ushering in a far less orderly and peaceful epoch.

Off the Radar

U.S. Participating in Regional Ebola Forum in Cuba

Latin American Herald Tribune

More than 250 officials and specialists from 32 Western Hemisphere countries, including the United States, are participating in a regional technical forum in this capital to exchange information about strategies to fight Ebola and coordinate efforts to prevent the spread of the virus to the region.

Top News

Mexico President, Missing Students’ Relatives at Odds After Meeting

By Tracy Wilkinson | Los Angeles Times

More than a month after 43 college students were led away by police and never seen again, Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto on Wednesday met with relatives of the missing men in a bid to shore up flagging public faith in the search.

Opinion

A Call For Authentic Democracy in Mexico

By John M. Ackerman | Los Angeles Times

There is finally a message of hope coming from south of the border. A powerful new social movement has emerged that could radically transform Mexico’s corrupt political system.

Off the Radar

Colombia Senate Approves Controversial Military Justice Reform

By Joel Gillin | Colombia Reports

Colombia’s Senate approved a controversial bill Wednesday that would give military courts greater jurisdiction and could increase impunity for the already slow-moving convictions of military atrocities, according to local media.

Top News

More Than 50 Countries Sign Tax Deal

By Harriet Torry | The Wall Street Journal

Officials from more than 50 countries signed an agreement they said marks a decisive step in combating tax evasion, a top priority for austerity-hit countries in Europe as they seek to fill depleted state coffers.

Ukraine Gas Supplies in Doubt as Russia Seeks EU Payment Deal

By Alastair Macdonald | Reuters

Ukraine’s efforts to unblock deliveries of Russian gas as winter sets in were deadlocked on Thursday as Moscow’s negotiators were quoted demanding firmer commitments from the European Union to cover Kiev’s pre-payments for energy.

Opinion

Putin Is Living in the Past

By Ivan Sukhov | The Moscow Times

Putin’s speech at Vladai illustrated that he is getting further and further out of touch with the rest of the world.

NATO: Rebellion in the Ranks?

By John Feffer | Foreign Policy in Focus

The countries of the former Warsaw Pact are not knuckling under to pressure from Russia. They’re trying to avoid a new cold war.

How the West Broke Its Promise to Moscow

By Joshua R. Itzkowitz Shifrinson | Foreign Affairs

Russian leaders often claim that the United States reneged on a promise not to expand NATO after the Cold War. They aren’t lying: although Washington never put a pledge in writing, U.S. officials worked hard to convince Moscow that NATO wouldn’t move east. And in international politics, informal commitments count.

Off the Radar

Top News

Burkina Faso Parliament Set Ablaze

BBC

Protesters angry at plans to allow Burkina Faso’s President Blaise Compaore to extend his 27-year-rule have set fire to parliament.

Opinion

Don’t Let Ebola Dehumanize Africa

By Angelique Kidjo | The New York Times

Fear-mongering about the disease is threatening to reverse decades of progress for the continent’s image.

Top News

Peshmerga Troops Start Entering Syrian Border Town

By Elena Becatoros | The Associated Press

Ten Iraqi peshmerga fighters entered a northern Syrian border town, crossing over from Turkey on Thursday, the first from among a group of 150 Kurdish troops on their way into the embattled Kobani, activists said.

Opinion

Top News

Activists: Myanmar Clinging to Political Prisoners

By Robin McDowell and Matthew Pennington | The Associated Press

Myanmar has freed more than a thousand political prisoners since former military rulers handed over power three years ago, a move that has smoothed the former pariah state’s international rehabilitation. Now the government says the job is done. Human rights activists and the U.S. say, not so fast.

Drone Strike Kills 2 Militants in NW Pakistan

By Ishtiaq Mahsud | The Associated Press

Suspected U.S. drone-fired missiles struck a house early on Thursday in a restive tribal region in northwest Pakistan, killing two militants, officials said.

Off the Radar