Media Roundup

United States

Top News

Afghanistan, U.S. Sign Long-Awaited Security Pact

Associated Press

Afghanistan and the United States signed a security pact on Tuesday to allow U.S. forces to remain in the country past the end of year, ending a year of uncertainty over the fate of foreign troops supporting Afghanis as they take over responsibility for the country's security.

Many Missteps in Assessment of ISIS Threat

By Peter Baker and Eric Schmitt | The New York Times

By late last year, classified American intelligence reports painted an increasingly ominous picture of a growing threat from Sunni extremists in Syria, according to senior intelligence and military officials. Just as worrisome, they said, were reports of deteriorating readiness and morale among troops next door in Iraq.

U.S. Intel Disputes Obama Claim on Islamic State

By Guy Taylor | The Washington Times

U.S. policy leaders, including President Obama, were repeatedly warned for more than a year by the U.S. intelligence community that the Islamic State terror group was gaining significant strength in Syria and was on the verge of seizing territory deep inside Iraq, where the military was struggling to respond.

Opinion

Obama's Mixed Message on War

By Jonah Goldberg | Los Angeles Times

In his "60 Minutes" interview Obama explained why the lion's share of the burden in this fight falls to us. ...He's right. For now.

The Obama-Military Divide

By Seth Cropsey | The Wall Street Journal

What should senior officers do if experience tells them that the president's plan to defeat ISIS is unworkable without U.S. combat troops?

Off the Radar

China, U.S. to Hold Defense Talks

People's Daily

China and the United States will hold the 15th annual Defense Consultative Talks in mid-October in Washington D.C., a Chinese defense ministry spokesman announced on Thursday.

Latin America

Top News

Convicted Priest Says El Salvador Backed Gang Work

By Jorge Sainz | Associated Press

Those who love Antonio Rodriguez know him affectionately as "Father Tony," the Roman Catholic priest who spent 15 years working in El Salvador's roughest neighborhoods to get vulnerable young men out of a gang lifestyle that often ends in death.

Opinion

Off the Radar

Peru, Chile to Submit Maritime Boundary Coordinates to U.N.

Andina

The foreign ministers of Peru and Chile met on the sidelines of the 69th U.N. General Assembly and agreed to jointly submit the maritime boundary coordinates established by the International Court of Justice in the Hague to the U.N.

South Africa to Provide Cuba with $30 Million in Aid

Latin American Herald Tribune

South Africa intends to provide Cuba with $31.2 million to help promote agriculture and rebuild infrastructure as a part of the bilateral cooperation agreement signed Friday in Pretoria.

11 Killed in Cartel Clash in Mexican Border State

By AP | Houston Chronicle

Prosecutors in the Mexican border state of Chihuahua say 11 people died in a confrontation between rival cartels fighting for control of turf in the Tarahumara mountain range.

Europe

Top News

Seeking Global Role, German Military Stumbles

By Alison Smale | The New York Times

In a spectacle that a leading weekly likened to a slapstick movie, Germany’s military, especially its air force, has repeatedly stumbled in recent days as it tried to ratchet up its international involvement by delivering personnel and matériel to forces battling Islamic extremists in Iraq and aid supplies to Africa to ease the Ebola crisis.

Opinion

Russia Is on a Road to Nowhere

By Vladislav Inozemtsev | The Moscow Times

Russia's reversal away from the West, which started in 2012, is a dead-end manuever because Russia cannot survive without the outside world.

Off the Radar

Turkey, Russia Energy Deal Intact

Anadolu Agency

Russia will continue with its $22 billion nuclear energy investment in Turkey, and both countries will strengthen economic cooperation despite their differences in outlook regarding regional political issues, says the Turkish energy minister.

French Far-Right Wins First Ever Senate Seats

MercoPress

The far-right National Front won its first ever seats in France’s upper house of parliament, as President Francois Hollande’s Socialist party lost its Senate majority.

Georgian, Turkish Presidents Meet in Istanbul

Civil Georgia

Georgian President Giorgi Margvelashvili met Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Istanbul on Sept. 28 on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum to discuss regional security issues, the deepening of Georgian-Turkish relations as well as the importance of implementation of Georgian-Turkish-Azerbaijani joint projects.

Africa

Top News

Libyan Parliament Rivals Hold First UN-Backed Talks

BBC

Representatives from rival factions in Libya's new parliament have held UN-brokered talks for the first time in the western oasis town of Ghadames. Sitting members of the House of Representatives met fellow MPs who have so far boycotted sessions.

Opinion

Anti-Terrorism Curbs Tunisian Liberties

By Omar Belhaj Salah | The Daily Star

Fifteen Tunisian soldiers were killed on July 16 on Mount Chaambi near the Algerian border, the deadliest assault on army personnel in nearly a year.

Off the Radar

Sudan FM to Visit Egypt to Prepare for Bashir’s Trip

Sudan Tribune

Sudanese Foreign Minister Ali Karti will travel to Egypt after the Eid al-Adha holiday to prepare for the upcoming visit by president Omar al-Bashir for a summit with his Egyptian counterpart Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi, it was reported today.

Middle East

Top News

Netanyahu Calls on Arabs to Take First Step for Peace

By Paul Richter | Los Angeles Times

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, in remarks to the United Nations General Assembly, said Monday that Arab nations should start working with Israel if they want to bring about an Israeli-Palestinian peace.

Turkey Government to Ask Parliament for Approval to Join Campaign Against Islamic State

By Ayla Albayrak And Joe Parkinson | The Wall Street Journal

Ayla Albayrak And Joe Parkinson The Turkish government was expected to submit motions to parliament Tuesday that would give it authorization to intervene in Iraq and Syria against forces of the extremist Islamic State. The motions are to be debated Thursday, with a vote due to follow, Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu said.

Iran to Help Lebanon Army Fight Extremists

By Bassem Mroue | Associated Press

The announcement marks the first time that Iran has said it would give Lebanon military assistance. Tehran has offered help in the past but such offers did not materialize because of sharp divisions among Lebanese political groups over Iran.

Opinion

A Litmus Test for Kurdistan

By Jenna Krajeski and Sebastian Meyer | The New York Times

The way the Kurds deal with sectarian tensions will show whether they can truly govern an inclusive independent state.

Off the Radar

Indian, Israeli PMs Meet for the First Time in Over a Decade

By Suhasini Haidar | The Hindu

In the first meeting between Indian and Israeli Prime Ministers in more than a decade, Prime Minister Modi asked Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to explain Israel’s perspective on the Islamic State (ISIS).

Turkish Tanks Reinforce Border as ISIS Shells Border Town

By Reuters | The Daily Star

Turkish tanks and armored vehicles took up positions on hills overlooking the besieged Syrian border town of Kobani on Monday as shelling by ISIS insurgents intensified and stray fire hit Turkish soil, a Reuters correspondent said.

Asia / Pacific

Top News

Hong Kong Leader Says Beijing Won't Back Down

By Elaine Kurtenbach | Associated Press

Hong Kong's leader said Tuesday that China won't back down from its decision to limit voting reforms in the Asian financial hub, dashing hopes that the standoff between demonstrators and authorities could be resolved quickly through negotiations.

N. Korea’s Kim, Recently Out of Public View, Had Ankle Surgery, Report Says

By Anna Fifield | The Washington Post

Kim Jong Un, the North Korean leader who has mysteriously been missing from the public eye for almost a month, sparking rumors covering every possibility from a stroke to a coup d’etat, is merely recovering from ankle surgery, a South Korean newspaper has reported.

Opinion

An Imperfect Afghanistan

By Gwynne Dyer | The Japan Times

Afghanistan is a strikingly imperfect society in almost every respect: politics, economy, security and human rights. Nor does the two-headed potential monster of a government now being created in Kabul make it an entirely lost cause.

Golden Rule: Why Beijing Is Buying

By Alan Greenspan | Foreign Affairs

In today's world of fiat currencies and floating exchange rates, a return to the gold standard seems to be nowhere on anybody’s horizon. Yet gold still has special properties that no other currency can claim -- which is why China is boosting its holdings.

Hirohito: String Puller, Not Puppet

By Herbert P. Bix | The New York Times

The Japanese government’s new biography perpetuates the false but persistent myth of a benign, passive figurehead.

China’s Climate Change Paradox

By Stephen Junor | The Diplomat

It is the world’s largest emitter of carbon dioxide, but recent shifts in China give cause for hope.

Off the Radar

Philippine, U.S. Exercises Near China-Claimed Waters

By AFP | The China Post

Thousands of Philippine and U.S. Marines on Monday began military exercises close to flashpoints in the South China Sea, where Beijing is involved in bitter territorial disputes with its neighbors.

Top News

Afghanistan, U.S. Sign Long-Awaited Security Pact

Associated Press

Afghanistan and the United States signed a security pact on Tuesday to allow U.S. forces to remain in the country past the end of year, ending a year of uncertainty over the fate of foreign troops supporting Afghanis as they take over responsibility for the country's security.

Many Missteps in Assessment of ISIS Threat

By Peter Baker and Eric Schmitt | The New York Times

By late last year, classified American intelligence reports painted an increasingly ominous picture of a growing threat from Sunni extremists in Syria, according to senior intelligence and military officials. Just as worrisome, they said, were reports of deteriorating readiness and morale among troops next door in Iraq.

U.S. Intel Disputes Obama Claim on Islamic State

By Guy Taylor | The Washington Times

U.S. policy leaders, including President Obama, were repeatedly warned for more than a year by the U.S. intelligence community that the Islamic State terror group was gaining significant strength in Syria and was on the verge of seizing territory deep inside Iraq, where the military was struggling to respond.

Opinion

Obama's Mixed Message on War

By Jonah Goldberg | Los Angeles Times

In his "60 Minutes" interview Obama explained why the lion's share of the burden in this fight falls to us. ...He's right. For now.

The Obama-Military Divide

By Seth Cropsey | The Wall Street Journal

What should senior officers do if experience tells them that the president's plan to defeat ISIS is unworkable without U.S. combat troops?

Off the Radar

China, U.S. to Hold Defense Talks

People's Daily

China and the United States will hold the 15th annual Defense Consultative Talks in mid-October in Washington D.C., a Chinese defense ministry spokesman announced on Thursday.

Top News

Convicted Priest Says El Salvador Backed Gang Work

By Jorge Sainz | Associated Press

Those who love Antonio Rodriguez know him affectionately as "Father Tony," the Roman Catholic priest who spent 15 years working in El Salvador's roughest neighborhoods to get vulnerable young men out of a gang lifestyle that often ends in death.

Opinion

Off the Radar

Peru, Chile to Submit Maritime Boundary Coordinates to U.N.

Andina

The foreign ministers of Peru and Chile met on the sidelines of the 69th U.N. General Assembly and agreed to jointly submit the maritime boundary coordinates established by the International Court of Justice in the Hague to the U.N.

South Africa to Provide Cuba with $30 Million in Aid

Latin American Herald Tribune

South Africa intends to provide Cuba with $31.2 million to help promote agriculture and rebuild infrastructure as a part of the bilateral cooperation agreement signed Friday in Pretoria.

11 Killed in Cartel Clash in Mexican Border State

By AP | Houston Chronicle

Prosecutors in the Mexican border state of Chihuahua say 11 people died in a confrontation between rival cartels fighting for control of turf in the Tarahumara mountain range.

Top News

Seeking Global Role, German Military Stumbles

By Alison Smale | The New York Times

In a spectacle that a leading weekly likened to a slapstick movie, Germany’s military, especially its air force, has repeatedly stumbled in recent days as it tried to ratchet up its international involvement by delivering personnel and matériel to forces battling Islamic extremists in Iraq and aid supplies to Africa to ease the Ebola crisis.

Opinion

Russia Is on a Road to Nowhere

By Vladislav Inozemtsev | The Moscow Times

Russia's reversal away from the West, which started in 2012, is a dead-end manuever because Russia cannot survive without the outside world.

Off the Radar

Turkey, Russia Energy Deal Intact

Anadolu Agency

Russia will continue with its $22 billion nuclear energy investment in Turkey, and both countries will strengthen economic cooperation despite their differences in outlook regarding regional political issues, says the Turkish energy minister.

French Far-Right Wins First Ever Senate Seats

MercoPress

The far-right National Front won its first ever seats in France’s upper house of parliament, as President Francois Hollande’s Socialist party lost its Senate majority.

Georgian, Turkish Presidents Meet in Istanbul

Civil Georgia

Georgian President Giorgi Margvelashvili met Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Istanbul on Sept. 28 on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum to discuss regional security issues, the deepening of Georgian-Turkish relations as well as the importance of implementation of Georgian-Turkish-Azerbaijani joint projects.

Top News

Libyan Parliament Rivals Hold First UN-Backed Talks

BBC

Representatives from rival factions in Libya's new parliament have held UN-brokered talks for the first time in the western oasis town of Ghadames. Sitting members of the House of Representatives met fellow MPs who have so far boycotted sessions.

Opinion

Anti-Terrorism Curbs Tunisian Liberties

By Omar Belhaj Salah | The Daily Star

Fifteen Tunisian soldiers were killed on July 16 on Mount Chaambi near the Algerian border, the deadliest assault on army personnel in nearly a year.

Off the Radar

Sudan FM to Visit Egypt to Prepare for Bashir’s Trip

Sudan Tribune

Sudanese Foreign Minister Ali Karti will travel to Egypt after the Eid al-Adha holiday to prepare for the upcoming visit by president Omar al-Bashir for a summit with his Egyptian counterpart Abdel-Fattah al-Sisi, it was reported today.

Top News

Netanyahu Calls on Arabs to Take First Step for Peace

By Paul Richter | Los Angeles Times

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, in remarks to the United Nations General Assembly, said Monday that Arab nations should start working with Israel if they want to bring about an Israeli-Palestinian peace.

Turkey Government to Ask Parliament for Approval to Join Campaign Against Islamic State

By Ayla Albayrak And Joe Parkinson | The Wall Street Journal

Ayla Albayrak And Joe Parkinson The Turkish government was expected to submit motions to parliament Tuesday that would give it authorization to intervene in Iraq and Syria against forces of the extremist Islamic State. The motions are to be debated Thursday, with a vote due to follow, Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu said.

Iran to Help Lebanon Army Fight Extremists

By Bassem Mroue | Associated Press

The announcement marks the first time that Iran has said it would give Lebanon military assistance. Tehran has offered help in the past but such offers did not materialize because of sharp divisions among Lebanese political groups over Iran.

Opinion

A Litmus Test for Kurdistan

By Jenna Krajeski and Sebastian Meyer | The New York Times

The way the Kurds deal with sectarian tensions will show whether they can truly govern an inclusive independent state.

Off the Radar

Indian, Israeli PMs Meet for the First Time in Over a Decade

By Suhasini Haidar | The Hindu

In the first meeting between Indian and Israeli Prime Ministers in more than a decade, Prime Minister Modi asked Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to explain Israel’s perspective on the Islamic State (ISIS).

Turkish Tanks Reinforce Border as ISIS Shells Border Town

By Reuters | The Daily Star

Turkish tanks and armored vehicles took up positions on hills overlooking the besieged Syrian border town of Kobani on Monday as shelling by ISIS insurgents intensified and stray fire hit Turkish soil, a Reuters correspondent said.

Top News

Hong Kong Leader Says Beijing Won't Back Down

By Elaine Kurtenbach | Associated Press

Hong Kong's leader said Tuesday that China won't back down from its decision to limit voting reforms in the Asian financial hub, dashing hopes that the standoff between demonstrators and authorities could be resolved quickly through negotiations.

N. Korea’s Kim, Recently Out of Public View, Had Ankle Surgery, Report Says

By Anna Fifield | The Washington Post

Kim Jong Un, the North Korean leader who has mysteriously been missing from the public eye for almost a month, sparking rumors covering every possibility from a stroke to a coup d’etat, is merely recovering from ankle surgery, a South Korean newspaper has reported.

Opinion

An Imperfect Afghanistan

By Gwynne Dyer | The Japan Times

Afghanistan is a strikingly imperfect society in almost every respect: politics, economy, security and human rights. Nor does the two-headed potential monster of a government now being created in Kabul make it an entirely lost cause.

Golden Rule: Why Beijing Is Buying

By Alan Greenspan | Foreign Affairs

In today's world of fiat currencies and floating exchange rates, a return to the gold standard seems to be nowhere on anybody’s horizon. Yet gold still has special properties that no other currency can claim -- which is why China is boosting its holdings.

Hirohito: String Puller, Not Puppet

By Herbert P. Bix | The New York Times

The Japanese government’s new biography perpetuates the false but persistent myth of a benign, passive figurehead.

China’s Climate Change Paradox

By Stephen Junor | The Diplomat

It is the world’s largest emitter of carbon dioxide, but recent shifts in China give cause for hope.

Off the Radar

Philippine, U.S. Exercises Near China-Claimed Waters

By AFP | The China Post

Thousands of Philippine and U.S. Marines on Monday began military exercises close to flashpoints in the South China Sea, where Beijing is involved in bitter territorial disputes with its neighbors.