Media Roundup

United States

Top News

Dallas Hospital Initially Let Ebola Patient Go With Drugs

By Kelly Gilblom and Robert Langreth | Bloomberg

The man, whose name wasn’t released, is the first case of the deadly viral infection to be diagnosed outside of Africa. He traveled from Liberia and arrived in the U.S. on Sept. 20, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said yesterday.

Opinion

The Nation-Building Trap

By Aaron David Miller | Foreign Policy

When it comes to destroying the Islamic State in Syria, boots on the ground should be the least of our worries.

Off the Radar

New U.S. Marine Corps Crisis Unit to Be Based in Kuwait

By Joe Gould and Paul McLeary | Defense News

The U.S. Marine Corps is preparing to deploy about 2,100 troops to be based out of Kuwait in a new unit configuration designed to respond to crises in the region, according to Corps officials.

Latin America

Top News

Rousseff Takes Lead in Brazil Election Poll

By Brad Brooks and Adriana Gomez Licon | The Associated Press

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff climbed in two election polls released Tuesday -- opening a solid runoff vote lead in one but remaining in a technical tie with her chief rival in another.

Opinion

Off the Radar

Europe

Top News

Poland to Update Foreign Policy

By Marcin Sobczyk | The Wall Street Journal

Poland's new prime minister said the government' would take a "pragmatic" approach regarding the separatist conflict in eastern Ukraine.

NATO Gets New Chief -- One Putin May Approve Of

By John-Thor Dahlburg | The Associated Press

At a time of daunting geopolitical crises, NATO is undergoing its own version of regime change, with the arrival of a new chief official who has the blessing, at least temporarily, of one of the West's biggest adversaries: Russian President Vladimir Putin.

The German Military Faces a Major Challenge From Disrepair

By Anthony Faiola | The Washington Post

For Germany’s military, hobbled helicopters were only the beginning. A parliamentary report leaked to the German press last week and obtained by The Washington Post detailed the shocking state of disrepair of Germany’s military hardware.

Karadzic Takes Blame For Serb Crimes

BBC

Radovan Karadzic sums up his defence saying he takes "moral responsibility" for crimes committed by Bosnian Serbs but denying he ordered killings.

Opinion

Putin Holds All the Cards in Ukraine

By Peter Rutland | The Moscow Times

It is increasingly obvious that Russia is winning in the battle for influence over Ukraine. What is not obvious, however, is what happens next and President Vladimir Putin's preferred outcome. Can he afford to sit back, or will he increase the pressure?

Off the Radar

Turkey, Russia Agree on Gas Flow Increase

By Reuters | Hurriyet Daily News

Russian natural gas producer Gazprom said Oct. 1 it has agreed with Turkey to increase the capacity of the Blue Stream underwater gas pipeline to 19 billion cubic meters (bcm), from 16 bcm.

Africa

Top News

Algeria’s Ailing President Absent Amid Crises

By Aomar Ouali | The Associated Press

The silence of Algeria’s ailing president since the kidnapping and beheading of a French hiker by Islamic State-inspired militants has ignited new concerns over his health and whether he’s fit to rule the oil-rich North African nation, or indeed whether he’s still doing so.

Opinion

Anti-Terrorism Curbs Tunisian Liberties

By Omar Belhaj Salah | The Daily Star

Fifteen Tunisian soldiers were killed on July 16 on Mount Chaambi near the Algerian border, the deadliest assault on army personnel in nearly a year.

Off the Radar

EAC, AU to Address Africa Disaster Risks

New Vision

The East African Community, in partnership with the African Union Commission and the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction is hosting the sixth Africa Working Group on Disaster Risk Reduction starting today (Wednesday) at the EAC headquarters in Arusha, Tanzania.

Middle East

Top News

The Caliphate Next Door: Turkey Faces Up to its Islamic State Problem

By Katrin Elger, Hasnain Kazim, Christoph Reuter and Holger Stark | Der Spiegel

For years, Ankara has been tolerating the rise of the extremist Islamic State. But now that the jihadists are conquering regions just across the border in northern Syria, concern is growing that Islamist terror could threaten Turkey too.

Kurds Claim Advances in Iraq as Britain Joins Fray

By Vivian Salama and Ryan Lucas | World Politics Review

Kurdish fighters in northern Iraq captured a border crossing with Syria on Tuesday, expelling Islamic State militants in heavy fighting that ground down to vicious house-to-house combat and close quarters sniping.

Saudi Overhaul Reshapes Islam's Holiest City, Mecca

By Aya Batrawy | The Associated Press

As a child, Osama al-Bar would walk from his home past Islam's holiest site, the Kaaba, to the market of spice and fabric merchants where his father owned a store. At that time, Mecca was so small, pilgrims could sit at the cube-shaped Kaaba and look out at the serene desert mountains where the Prophet Muhammad once walked.

Opinion

The Destruction of Mecca

By Ziaddin Sardar | The New York Times

The Saudis have bulldozed centuries of beauty and diversity in Islam’s holiest city.

Off the Radar

Iraq Gets Third Batch of Russian Mi-35M Helicopters

RIA Novosti

Iraq’s Ministry of Defense has received the third batch of Russian Mi-35M helicopters, as part of a contract signed in 2012, an official representative of the Centre for Analysis of World Arms Trade (CAWAT) told RIA Novosti Wednesday.

Asia / Pacific

Top News

No Images of Hong Kong Protests in China's Media

By Didi Tang | The Associated Press

China's government has cut off news about Hong Kong's pro-democracy protests to the rest of the country, a clampdown so thorough that no image of the rallies has appeared in state-controlled media, and at least one man has been detained for reposting accounts of the events.

Opinion

Off the Radar

India Set to Run Out of Critical Free Drug for HIV/AIDS Program

By Aditya Kalra | Reuters

India could run out of a critical medicine in its free HIV/AIDS drugs program in three weeks due to bureaucratic bungling, a senior government official said, leaving more than 150,000 sufferers without life-saving drugs for about a month.

Top News

Dallas Hospital Initially Let Ebola Patient Go With Drugs

By Kelly Gilblom and Robert Langreth | Bloomberg

The man, whose name wasn’t released, is the first case of the deadly viral infection to be diagnosed outside of Africa. He traveled from Liberia and arrived in the U.S. on Sept. 20, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said yesterday.

Opinion

The Nation-Building Trap

By Aaron David Miller | Foreign Policy

When it comes to destroying the Islamic State in Syria, boots on the ground should be the least of our worries.

Off the Radar

New U.S. Marine Corps Crisis Unit to Be Based in Kuwait

By Joe Gould and Paul McLeary | Defense News

The U.S. Marine Corps is preparing to deploy about 2,100 troops to be based out of Kuwait in a new unit configuration designed to respond to crises in the region, according to Corps officials.

Top News

Rousseff Takes Lead in Brazil Election Poll

By Brad Brooks and Adriana Gomez Licon | The Associated Press

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff climbed in two election polls released Tuesday -- opening a solid runoff vote lead in one but remaining in a technical tie with her chief rival in another.

Opinion

Off the Radar

Top News

Poland to Update Foreign Policy

By Marcin Sobczyk | The Wall Street Journal

Poland's new prime minister said the government' would take a "pragmatic" approach regarding the separatist conflict in eastern Ukraine.

NATO Gets New Chief -- One Putin May Approve Of

By John-Thor Dahlburg | The Associated Press

At a time of daunting geopolitical crises, NATO is undergoing its own version of regime change, with the arrival of a new chief official who has the blessing, at least temporarily, of one of the West's biggest adversaries: Russian President Vladimir Putin.

The German Military Faces a Major Challenge From Disrepair

By Anthony Faiola | The Washington Post

For Germany’s military, hobbled helicopters were only the beginning. A parliamentary report leaked to the German press last week and obtained by The Washington Post detailed the shocking state of disrepair of Germany’s military hardware.

Karadzic Takes Blame For Serb Crimes

BBC

Radovan Karadzic sums up his defence saying he takes "moral responsibility" for crimes committed by Bosnian Serbs but denying he ordered killings.

Opinion

Putin Holds All the Cards in Ukraine

By Peter Rutland | The Moscow Times

It is increasingly obvious that Russia is winning in the battle for influence over Ukraine. What is not obvious, however, is what happens next and President Vladimir Putin's preferred outcome. Can he afford to sit back, or will he increase the pressure?

Off the Radar

Turkey, Russia Agree on Gas Flow Increase

By Reuters | Hurriyet Daily News

Russian natural gas producer Gazprom said Oct. 1 it has agreed with Turkey to increase the capacity of the Blue Stream underwater gas pipeline to 19 billion cubic meters (bcm), from 16 bcm.

Top News

Algeria’s Ailing President Absent Amid Crises

By Aomar Ouali | The Associated Press

The silence of Algeria’s ailing president since the kidnapping and beheading of a French hiker by Islamic State-inspired militants has ignited new concerns over his health and whether he’s fit to rule the oil-rich North African nation, or indeed whether he’s still doing so.

Opinion

Anti-Terrorism Curbs Tunisian Liberties

By Omar Belhaj Salah | The Daily Star

Fifteen Tunisian soldiers were killed on July 16 on Mount Chaambi near the Algerian border, the deadliest assault on army personnel in nearly a year.

Off the Radar

EAC, AU to Address Africa Disaster Risks

New Vision

The East African Community, in partnership with the African Union Commission and the United Nations Office for Disaster Risk Reduction is hosting the sixth Africa Working Group on Disaster Risk Reduction starting today (Wednesday) at the EAC headquarters in Arusha, Tanzania.

Top News

The Caliphate Next Door: Turkey Faces Up to its Islamic State Problem

By Katrin Elger, Hasnain Kazim, Christoph Reuter and Holger Stark | Der Spiegel

For years, Ankara has been tolerating the rise of the extremist Islamic State. But now that the jihadists are conquering regions just across the border in northern Syria, concern is growing that Islamist terror could threaten Turkey too.

Kurds Claim Advances in Iraq as Britain Joins Fray

By Vivian Salama and Ryan Lucas | World Politics Review

Kurdish fighters in northern Iraq captured a border crossing with Syria on Tuesday, expelling Islamic State militants in heavy fighting that ground down to vicious house-to-house combat and close quarters sniping.

Saudi Overhaul Reshapes Islam's Holiest City, Mecca

By Aya Batrawy | The Associated Press

As a child, Osama al-Bar would walk from his home past Islam's holiest site, the Kaaba, to the market of spice and fabric merchants where his father owned a store. At that time, Mecca was so small, pilgrims could sit at the cube-shaped Kaaba and look out at the serene desert mountains where the Prophet Muhammad once walked.

Opinion

The Destruction of Mecca

By Ziaddin Sardar | The New York Times

The Saudis have bulldozed centuries of beauty and diversity in Islam’s holiest city.

Off the Radar

Iraq Gets Third Batch of Russian Mi-35M Helicopters

RIA Novosti

Iraq’s Ministry of Defense has received the third batch of Russian Mi-35M helicopters, as part of a contract signed in 2012, an official representative of the Centre for Analysis of World Arms Trade (CAWAT) told RIA Novosti Wednesday.

Top News

No Images of Hong Kong Protests in China's Media

By Didi Tang | The Associated Press

China's government has cut off news about Hong Kong's pro-democracy protests to the rest of the country, a clampdown so thorough that no image of the rallies has appeared in state-controlled media, and at least one man has been detained for reposting accounts of the events.

Opinion

Off the Radar

India Set to Run Out of Critical Free Drug for HIV/AIDS Program

By Aditya Kalra | Reuters

India could run out of a critical medicine in its free HIV/AIDS drugs program in three weeks due to bureaucratic bungling, a senior government official said, leaving more than 150,000 sufferers without life-saving drugs for about a month.