Media Roundup

United States

Top News

Rubio Makes Plans for 2016 Election Run

By Peter Nicholas and Patrick O’Connor | The Wall Street Journal

Sen. Marco Rubio is laying plans to announce his presidential bid in two weeks, a further sign that the early sparring and positioning in the 2016 race for the White House is accelerating.

Opinion

Iran Matters Most

By Roger Cohen | The New York Times

America cannot stop the Sunni-Shia schism in the Middle East or its violence. It’s a time for fierce realism.

The Americas

Top News

Teen Libertarian Is Face of Brazil’s Young Free-Market Right

By Adriana Gomez Licon | The Associated Press

Microphone in hand and standing atop the sound truck, the raspy-voiced protest leader jabbed his finger into the air shouting for the ouster of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, igniting wild cheers from the crowd below him.

Off the Radar

Evo Morales’ Party Loses La Paz in Bolivian Elections

By Carlos Valdez | Latin American Herald Tribune

President Evo Morales’ governing party suffered its most serious setback of nearly a decade in power in local and regional elections Sunday, according to unofficial results.

Europe

Top News

Germany Says Greece Must Flesh Out Reforms to Unlock Aid

By Lefteris Papadimas and Caroline Copley | Reuters

Greece’s biggest creditor Germany said on Monday that the euro zone would give Athens no further financial aid until it has a more detailed list of reforms and some are enacted into law, adding to skepticism over plans presented last week.

France’s Far Right Wins 62 Seats But Not a Local Council

By Sylvie Corbet | The Associated Press

Far-right National Front leader Marine Le Pen couldn’t hide her disappointment Monday not to have won one single local council in France’s election, but insisted she was satisfied with her party’s performance.

Opinion

Last Chance for Ukraine and Europe

By George Soros | Project Syndicate

The European Union stands at a crossroads. The shape it takes five years from now will be decided in the coming three to five months.

Putin’s Economic Team Plays Houdini

By Leonid Bershidsky | Bloomberg View

Perhaps Russia’s improving indicators will convince Western governments that economic sanctions are having no discernible effect and that President Vladimir Putin’s regime and the country it runs aren’t facing imminent collapse.

A Hateful Sort of Love

By George Packer | The New Yorker

Over the weekend, a group of right-wing extremists from across Europe and the United States met at a Holiday Inn in St. Petersburg. They were there to attend the first convention of the International Russian Conservative Forum.

Off the Radar

Hungary’s Nuclear Deal Under EU Scrutiny

By Krisztina Than | Reuters

European officials are examining whether the Paks project meets EU rules on state aid and the supply of nuclear material from Russia. The EU sets limits on state subsidies, and has rules designed to prevent EU countries becoming over-dependent on Russia for nuclear fuel.

Africa

Top News

Hope, Fear as Nigerians Await Results of Presidential Vote

By Michelle Faul | The Associated Press

Nigerians waited in hope and fear on Monday for results of a presidential election in which voting was relatively smooth nationwide despite technical glitches, deadly attacks by Islamic extremists and allegations of political thuggery in some areas.

Off the Radar

Middle East

Top News

Key Suspect in Attack on Museum in Tunis Is Killed

The Washington Post

Tunisian security forces decimated the leadership of a Tunisian extremist group linked to al-Qaida’s North African branch, including the man identified as the “operational chief” of the attack this month on the National Bardo Museum that killed 22 people, mostly foreign tourists, the interior minister said Sunday.

Turkey Moves to Close All Gates at Border With Syria

By Cylan Yeginsu and Karam Shoumali | The New York Times

After maintaining an open-door policy through the four years of civil war in neighboring Syria, Turkey has begun shutting out refugees amid fears of a possible terrorist attack.

Iran Says U.S. Drone Kills 2 Advisers in Iraq; U.S. Denies Claim

By Vivian Salama and Nasser Karimi | The Associated Press

Iran’s Revolutionary Guard says a U.S. drone strike has killed two of its advisers in Iraq, though the U.S. said Monday it has only struck militants in its campaign against the Islamic State group.

Arab League to Forge NATO-like Military Alliance of Sunni Powers

By Guy Taylor | The Washington Times

Analysts say the decision by the Arab League to create a collective fighting force that will consist initially of some 40,000 elite troops from several Sunni Arab nations backed by fighter jets and warships was driven mostly by desire from Saudi Arabia—the wealthiest member of the alliance—to confront more aggressively a potentially nuclear-armed Iran and its proxies.

Opinion

Yemen’s Wily Puppet Master

By Matt Schiavenza | The Atlantic

Ali Abdullah Saleh, ousted in the Arab Spring protests, has re-emerged as the country’s most influential man.

Houthi and the Blowback

By Bilal Y. Saab | Foreign Affairs

With the intervention in Yemen, Saudi Arabia’s military is trying to kill several birds with one stone: safeguard the country from an immediate military threat, assert its leadership of the Arab world, and redress what it sees as a geopolitical imbalance in the Middle East between itself and Iran.

Off the Radar

Asia / Pacific

Top News

Opinion

Off the Radar

Malaysia Proposes Anti-Terror Laws to Curb Islamic Militants

The Associated Press

Malaysia’s government has proposed two new anti-terror laws that reintroduce indefinite detention without trial and allow the seizure of passports of anyone suspected of supporting terror acts to curb militant activities in the country.

Top News

Rubio Makes Plans for 2016 Election Run

By Peter Nicholas and Patrick O’Connor | The Wall Street Journal

Sen. Marco Rubio is laying plans to announce his presidential bid in two weeks, a further sign that the early sparring and positioning in the 2016 race for the White House is accelerating.

Opinion

Iran Matters Most

By Roger Cohen | The New York Times

America cannot stop the Sunni-Shia schism in the Middle East or its violence. It’s a time for fierce realism.

Top News

Teen Libertarian Is Face of Brazil’s Young Free-Market Right

By Adriana Gomez Licon | The Associated Press

Microphone in hand and standing atop the sound truck, the raspy-voiced protest leader jabbed his finger into the air shouting for the ouster of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, igniting wild cheers from the crowd below him.

Off the Radar

Evo Morales’ Party Loses La Paz in Bolivian Elections

By Carlos Valdez | Latin American Herald Tribune

President Evo Morales’ governing party suffered its most serious setback of nearly a decade in power in local and regional elections Sunday, according to unofficial results.

Top News

Germany Says Greece Must Flesh Out Reforms to Unlock Aid

By Lefteris Papadimas and Caroline Copley | Reuters

Greece’s biggest creditor Germany said on Monday that the euro zone would give Athens no further financial aid until it has a more detailed list of reforms and some are enacted into law, adding to skepticism over plans presented last week.

France’s Far Right Wins 62 Seats But Not a Local Council

By Sylvie Corbet | The Associated Press

Far-right National Front leader Marine Le Pen couldn’t hide her disappointment Monday not to have won one single local council in France’s election, but insisted she was satisfied with her party’s performance.

Opinion

Last Chance for Ukraine and Europe

By George Soros | Project Syndicate

The European Union stands at a crossroads. The shape it takes five years from now will be decided in the coming three to five months.

Putin’s Economic Team Plays Houdini

By Leonid Bershidsky | Bloomberg View

Perhaps Russia’s improving indicators will convince Western governments that economic sanctions are having no discernible effect and that President Vladimir Putin’s regime and the country it runs aren’t facing imminent collapse.

A Hateful Sort of Love

By George Packer | The New Yorker

Over the weekend, a group of right-wing extremists from across Europe and the United States met at a Holiday Inn in St. Petersburg. They were there to attend the first convention of the International Russian Conservative Forum.

Off the Radar

Hungary’s Nuclear Deal Under EU Scrutiny

By Krisztina Than | Reuters

European officials are examining whether the Paks project meets EU rules on state aid and the supply of nuclear material from Russia. The EU sets limits on state subsidies, and has rules designed to prevent EU countries becoming over-dependent on Russia for nuclear fuel.

Top News

Hope, Fear as Nigerians Await Results of Presidential Vote

By Michelle Faul | The Associated Press

Nigerians waited in hope and fear on Monday for results of a presidential election in which voting was relatively smooth nationwide despite technical glitches, deadly attacks by Islamic extremists and allegations of political thuggery in some areas.

Off the Radar

Top News

Key Suspect in Attack on Museum in Tunis Is Killed

The Washington Post

Tunisian security forces decimated the leadership of a Tunisian extremist group linked to al-Qaida’s North African branch, including the man identified as the “operational chief” of the attack this month on the National Bardo Museum that killed 22 people, mostly foreign tourists, the interior minister said Sunday.

Turkey Moves to Close All Gates at Border With Syria

By Cylan Yeginsu and Karam Shoumali | The New York Times

After maintaining an open-door policy through the four years of civil war in neighboring Syria, Turkey has begun shutting out refugees amid fears of a possible terrorist attack.

Iran Says U.S. Drone Kills 2 Advisers in Iraq; U.S. Denies Claim

By Vivian Salama and Nasser Karimi | The Associated Press

Iran’s Revolutionary Guard says a U.S. drone strike has killed two of its advisers in Iraq, though the U.S. said Monday it has only struck militants in its campaign against the Islamic State group.

Arab League to Forge NATO-like Military Alliance of Sunni Powers

By Guy Taylor | The Washington Times

Analysts say the decision by the Arab League to create a collective fighting force that will consist initially of some 40,000 elite troops from several Sunni Arab nations backed by fighter jets and warships was driven mostly by desire from Saudi Arabia—the wealthiest member of the alliance—to confront more aggressively a potentially nuclear-armed Iran and its proxies.

Opinion

Yemen’s Wily Puppet Master

By Matt Schiavenza | The Atlantic

Ali Abdullah Saleh, ousted in the Arab Spring protests, has re-emerged as the country’s most influential man.

Houthi and the Blowback

By Bilal Y. Saab | Foreign Affairs

With the intervention in Yemen, Saudi Arabia’s military is trying to kill several birds with one stone: safeguard the country from an immediate military threat, assert its leadership of the Arab world, and redress what it sees as a geopolitical imbalance in the Middle East between itself and Iran.

Off the Radar

Top News

Opinion

Off the Radar

Malaysia Proposes Anti-Terror Laws to Curb Islamic Militants

The Associated Press

Malaysia’s government has proposed two new anti-terror laws that reintroduce indefinite detention without trial and allow the seizure of passports of anyone suspected of supporting terror acts to curb militant activities in the country.