Media Roundup

United States

Top News

Canada Attack Stirs Terror Fears

By Rob Gillies and Benjamin Shingler | The Associated Press

Two deadly attacks in three days against members of the military stunned Canadians and raised fears their country was being targeted for reprisals for joining the U.S.-led air campaign against an extremist Islamic group in Iraq and Syria.

Whistleblowers Say USAID’s IG Removed Critical Details From Public Reports

By Scott Higham and Steven Rich | The Washington Post

After the fall of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in 2011, the U.S. Agency for International Development hired several non­governmental organizations to set up pro-democracy programs in Egypt—even though they were not registered to work in the country.

Opinion

Is Obama a Modern-Day Quintus Fabius Maximus?

By Brian Michael Jenkins | Los Angeles Times

President Obama has been repeatedly accused of delay. Critics say he dragged his feet on sending more troops to Afghanistan, on addressing the dangers in Libya, on providing support to Syria’s rebels and, most recently, on initiating military action against Islamic State.

Grappling With Graft

By Alexander Lebedev and Vladislav Inozemtsev | Foreign Affairs

The world needs a new international convention to combat corruption—a global epidemic that erodes government institutions, fuels unrest and increasingly threatens the stability of the West.

Terrorism: The Internet Is Not the Enemy

By Jillian C. York | Foreign Policy

Global efforts to stop the Islamic State should not come at the expense of online freedom. Let the world see the depravity of their ideology.

Latin America

Top News

Despite Riches, Venezuela Starts Food Rationing

By Sara Schaefer Muñoz | The Wall Street Journal

Amid worsening shortages, Venezuela recently reached a milestone of dubious distinction: It has joined the ranks of North Korea and Cuba in rationing food for its citizens.

Brazil Race Hinges on Appeal to Lower Middle Class

By Brad Brooks | The Associated Press

The debate boiled in Lena’s Salon in Rio’s Cantagalo slum, as patrons argued about who should win Sunday’s presidential election. In one corner, owner Lucia Helena Silva was loudly arguing for President Dilma Rousseff and her Workers’ Party, waving a hot straightening iron.

Off the Radar

Landmark Education Reform Passed in Chile

By Valerie Dekimpe | The Santiago Times

Less than a year after President Michelle Bachelet’s presidential election, Chile’s Chamber of Deputies voted in favor of the head of state’s education reform—a pillar of her campaign—Tuesday.

Europe

Top News

Russia Keeps Its Powder Dry as Ukraine Votes

Agence France-Presse

As war-weary Ukraine prepares to vote in a snap parliamentary election on Oct. 26, its former master Russia stands by for once apparently unable to influence the outcome.

Off the Radar

Albania, Kosovo Officials Visit Rival Serbia

Associated Press

A Kosovo foreign minister traveled to Serbia on Thursday for the first time since Kosovo declared independence in 2008. Enver Hoxhaj described the visit as a historic event and a sign of improving ties.

Africa

Top News

Opinion

Off the Radar

Botswana’s Ruling Party Favored in Elections

By Sello Motseta | Associated Press

The ruling party in Botswana, which has dominated politics since independence in 1966, is again the front-runner ahead of elections Friday in the southern African nation.

Russian Army Starts Counterinsurgency Training for 1,200 Nigerian Personnel

By Oscar Nkala | defenceWeb

The Nigerian security services have sent 1,200 personnel to Russia where they are receiving advanced counterinsurgency training from Russian special forces and will return to form the nucleus of a special counterinsurgency force which will be deployed to fight Boko Haram militants.

Equatorial Guinea Grants Political Amnesty Before Talks

By Bernardino Ndze Biyoa | Reuters

Equatorial Guinea’s president has granted an amnesty for political crimes, state media reported, as part of efforts to convince exiled politicians and other opposition figures to join a rare round of talks next month.

Tanzanian President to Visit Vietnam

Viet Nam News

Tanzanian President Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete will visit Vietnam from Oct. 26-28 at the invitation of Vietnamese President Truong Tan Sang, the Foreign Ministry announced yesterday.

Middle East

Top News

Kurdish Rise Helps West, Worries Turkey

By Joe Parkison | The Wall Street Journal

Kurds in Iraq and Syria set aside long-held rivalries and took steps to unify their forces this week to battle Islamic State, magnifying fears in Turkey that a powerful enemy is on the rise.

China, Iran Defense Officials Pledge Closer Ties

The Associated Press

China’s defense minister met Thursday with Iran’s navy commander in the latest sign of warming ties between their two militaries following their first joint naval drills in the Persian Gulf last month.

Opinion

Bombs Away: Time to Escalate the Air Campaign against ISIL

By Zalmay Khalilzad | The National Interest

The mixed impact of the airstrikes has called into question the broader effectiveness of the president’s strategy, and intensified the debate on whether the United States and allies need to send combat troops.

Off the Radar

Boeing Sells First Parts to Iran Since 1979

Al Jazeera

Boeing has sold plane parts to Iran Air, the first time it has done business with the Tehran’s national carrier since the 1979 hostage crisis, the U.S. aviation firm reported.

Asia / Pacific

Top News

Afghanistan’s New President Faces a Campaign-Scarred Economy

By Ali M. Latifi | Los Angeles Times

As a former World Bank official, Afghanistan’s new president has helped develop economic programs for Russia, India and China. But it is in his homeland that Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai faces the greatest fiscal challenge of his career.

China Opposes Sending North Korea to International Court

The Associated Press

China said Thursday it was against referring North Korea to the International Criminal Court, dimming chances that its longtime ally will face additional scrutiny over its dismal and well-documented system of sprawling political prison camps, starvation and mass executions.

China’s Ruling Party Opens Meeting on Rule of Law

The Associated Press

China’s ruling Communist Party said it will take steps to improve judicial independence and put checks on political interference in the courts, as its Central Committee concluded its annual meeting on Thursday.

Opinion

The TPP’s Missing Ingredient

By Simon Johnson | Project Syndicate

Looking for ways to stimulate economic growth and create jobs, U.S. President Barack Obama’s administration is seeking to press ahead with the mega-regional free-trade deal known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). But is the U.S. going about it the right way?

Top News

Canada Attack Stirs Terror Fears

By Rob Gillies and Benjamin Shingler | The Associated Press

Two deadly attacks in three days against members of the military stunned Canadians and raised fears their country was being targeted for reprisals for joining the U.S.-led air campaign against an extremist Islamic group in Iraq and Syria.

Whistleblowers Say USAID’s IG Removed Critical Details From Public Reports

By Scott Higham and Steven Rich | The Washington Post

After the fall of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in 2011, the U.S. Agency for International Development hired several non­governmental organizations to set up pro-democracy programs in Egypt—even though they were not registered to work in the country.

Opinion

Is Obama a Modern-Day Quintus Fabius Maximus?

By Brian Michael Jenkins | Los Angeles Times

President Obama has been repeatedly accused of delay. Critics say he dragged his feet on sending more troops to Afghanistan, on addressing the dangers in Libya, on providing support to Syria’s rebels and, most recently, on initiating military action against Islamic State.

Grappling With Graft

By Alexander Lebedev and Vladislav Inozemtsev | Foreign Affairs

The world needs a new international convention to combat corruption—a global epidemic that erodes government institutions, fuels unrest and increasingly threatens the stability of the West.

Terrorism: The Internet Is Not the Enemy

By Jillian C. York | Foreign Policy

Global efforts to stop the Islamic State should not come at the expense of online freedom. Let the world see the depravity of their ideology.

Top News

Despite Riches, Venezuela Starts Food Rationing

By Sara Schaefer Muñoz | The Wall Street Journal

Amid worsening shortages, Venezuela recently reached a milestone of dubious distinction: It has joined the ranks of North Korea and Cuba in rationing food for its citizens.

Brazil Race Hinges on Appeal to Lower Middle Class

By Brad Brooks | The Associated Press

The debate boiled in Lena’s Salon in Rio’s Cantagalo slum, as patrons argued about who should win Sunday’s presidential election. In one corner, owner Lucia Helena Silva was loudly arguing for President Dilma Rousseff and her Workers’ Party, waving a hot straightening iron.

Off the Radar

Landmark Education Reform Passed in Chile

By Valerie Dekimpe | The Santiago Times

Less than a year after President Michelle Bachelet’s presidential election, Chile’s Chamber of Deputies voted in favor of the head of state’s education reform—a pillar of her campaign—Tuesday.

Top News

Russia Keeps Its Powder Dry as Ukraine Votes

Agence France-Presse

As war-weary Ukraine prepares to vote in a snap parliamentary election on Oct. 26, its former master Russia stands by for once apparently unable to influence the outcome.

Off the Radar

Albania, Kosovo Officials Visit Rival Serbia

Associated Press

A Kosovo foreign minister traveled to Serbia on Thursday for the first time since Kosovo declared independence in 2008. Enver Hoxhaj described the visit as a historic event and a sign of improving ties.

Top News

Opinion

Off the Radar

Botswana’s Ruling Party Favored in Elections

By Sello Motseta | Associated Press

The ruling party in Botswana, which has dominated politics since independence in 1966, is again the front-runner ahead of elections Friday in the southern African nation.

Russian Army Starts Counterinsurgency Training for 1,200 Nigerian Personnel

By Oscar Nkala | defenceWeb

The Nigerian security services have sent 1,200 personnel to Russia where they are receiving advanced counterinsurgency training from Russian special forces and will return to form the nucleus of a special counterinsurgency force which will be deployed to fight Boko Haram militants.

Equatorial Guinea Grants Political Amnesty Before Talks

By Bernardino Ndze Biyoa | Reuters

Equatorial Guinea’s president has granted an amnesty for political crimes, state media reported, as part of efforts to convince exiled politicians and other opposition figures to join a rare round of talks next month.

Tanzanian President to Visit Vietnam

Viet Nam News

Tanzanian President Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete will visit Vietnam from Oct. 26-28 at the invitation of Vietnamese President Truong Tan Sang, the Foreign Ministry announced yesterday.

Top News

Kurdish Rise Helps West, Worries Turkey

By Joe Parkison | The Wall Street Journal

Kurds in Iraq and Syria set aside long-held rivalries and took steps to unify their forces this week to battle Islamic State, magnifying fears in Turkey that a powerful enemy is on the rise.

China, Iran Defense Officials Pledge Closer Ties

The Associated Press

China’s defense minister met Thursday with Iran’s navy commander in the latest sign of warming ties between their two militaries following their first joint naval drills in the Persian Gulf last month.

Opinion

Bombs Away: Time to Escalate the Air Campaign against ISIL

By Zalmay Khalilzad | The National Interest

The mixed impact of the airstrikes has called into question the broader effectiveness of the president’s strategy, and intensified the debate on whether the United States and allies need to send combat troops.

Off the Radar

Boeing Sells First Parts to Iran Since 1979

Al Jazeera

Boeing has sold plane parts to Iran Air, the first time it has done business with the Tehran’s national carrier since the 1979 hostage crisis, the U.S. aviation firm reported.

Top News

Afghanistan’s New President Faces a Campaign-Scarred Economy

By Ali M. Latifi | Los Angeles Times

As a former World Bank official, Afghanistan’s new president has helped develop economic programs for Russia, India and China. But it is in his homeland that Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai faces the greatest fiscal challenge of his career.

China Opposes Sending North Korea to International Court

The Associated Press

China said Thursday it was against referring North Korea to the International Criminal Court, dimming chances that its longtime ally will face additional scrutiny over its dismal and well-documented system of sprawling political prison camps, starvation and mass executions.

China’s Ruling Party Opens Meeting on Rule of Law

The Associated Press

China’s ruling Communist Party said it will take steps to improve judicial independence and put checks on political interference in the courts, as its Central Committee concluded its annual meeting on Thursday.

Opinion

The TPP’s Missing Ingredient

By Simon Johnson | Project Syndicate

Looking for ways to stimulate economic growth and create jobs, U.S. President Barack Obama’s administration is seeking to press ahead with the mega-regional free-trade deal known as the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). But is the U.S. going about it the right way?