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United States

News

March 23, 2017

Opinion

March 23, 2017

Nationalists and Globalists

By Anne-Marie Slaughter | Project Syndicate

Populism means a politics of the people, juxtaposed against a politics of the elites. But, at least in the U.S., President Donald Trump’s ideology – which has little to do with traditional Republican conservatism – frames the axis of division not as the many versus the few, but as nationalists versus globalists.

The Americas

News

March 23, 2017

Opinion

March 23, 2017

Europe

News

March 23, 2017

The former Russian MP Denis Voronenkov has been shot and killed in Kiev. Police said an unidentified gunman had shot Voronenkov dead at the entrance of an upmarket hotel in the Ukrainian capital.

Opinion

March 23, 2017

A Franco-German Bargain to Save Europe

By Philip Stephens | Financial Times (subscription required)

A restored relationship between Berlin and Paris would be an important source of confidence. It might also mark the beginning of a new “core Europe” with the will and capacity to deepen cooperation. Hard as it is to be optimistic about Europe, it is time to temper some of the pessimism.

EU Deeply Divided Over Western Sahara Policy

By Charlotte Bruneau | Al-Monitor

A European Court of Justice decision excluding Western Saharan exports from receiving preferential tariffs granted to Morocco has highlighted the need for the European Union to address the issue of who represents the people of Western Sahara.

Africa

News

March 23, 2017

Africa faces the world's largest humanitarian crisis since 1945, with more than 20 million people facing starvation, and any cut in funding to humanitarian agencies working in famine-affected areas will cause untold suffering, a spokesman for the World Food Program said Thursday, responding to questions about U.S. President Donald Trump's proposal to cut $10 billion in foreign aid.

More from WPR: What Does the Populist Wave Mean for Global Aid and Development?

Uganda is at a "breaking point" as almost 3,000 South Sudanese refugees pour into the country every day, the United Nations refugee chief said Thursday. The U.N. has called it the world's fastest-growing refugee crisis.

A former warlord and ex-vice-president of the Democratic Republic of the Congo has been sentenced by the International Criminal Court (ICC) to a year in jail and fined $320,000 for bribing witnesses during an earlier war crimes trial. Wednesday’s verdict and sentence are the first of their kind in the history of the ICC.

More from WPR: The ICC Is Flawed. Is It Still Africa’s Best Hope for Justice?

Opinion

March 23, 2017

Middle East & North Africa

News

March 23, 2017

Jihadists and other rebel groups made advances against the Syrian army north of Hama on Thursday, a war monitor said, part of their biggest offensive for months, underscoring the bleak prospects for peace talks which resume later in the day.

Opinion

March 23, 2017

Five Myths About Syrian Refugees

By Max Abrahms, Denis Sullivan, & Charles Simpson | Foreign Affairs

The Syrian refugee crisis is the worst human security disaster of the twenty-first century. Yet a lack of direct evidence from the field has spawned speculation, misinformation, and poorly informed policymaking.

News

March 22, 2017

U.S. Forces Ferry Syrian-Kurdish Fighters Behind IS Lines

By Philip Issa & Robert Burns | Associated Press

U.S. aircraft ferried Syrian Kurdish fighters and allied forces behind Islamic State lines on Wednesday to spearhead a major ground assault on a strategic town held by the extremist group outside its self-declared capital, Raqqa, the Pentagon said, marking the first time U.S. forces have provided airlift for local forces on a combat operation in Syria.

More from WPR: Trump’s Real Challenge in the Middle East: Don’t Follow Russia and Iran

Russia Strengthens Presence in Kurdish-Held Syria

By Erika Solomon | Financial Times (subscription required)

Russia is building up its presence in Kurdish-held areas of northern Syria in a move likely to alarm neighbouring Turkey. A Kurdish militia known as the YPG said Moscow had set up a base in the Afrin area to train the Kurdish forces and establish a point of direct contact.

Asia-Pacific

News

March 23, 2017

For the fifth time in the two decades since this former British colony’s return to Chinese rule, Hong Kong’s next chief executive will be selected on Sunday by a committee stacked with supporters of the Chinese government rather than by a free election.

Taliban Forces Seize Strategic District in Embattled Helmand Province

By Pamela Constable & Sayed Salahuddin | The Washington Post

Taliban insurgents captured a strategic district in embattled Helmand Province Thursday, officials said, while Afghan troops were evacuated from the area and Air Force planes bombed military installations there to prevent the Taliban from using them.

Opinion

March 23, 2017

United States

News

March 23, 2017

Opinion

March 23, 2017

Nationalists and Globalists

By Anne-Marie Slaughter | Project Syndicate

Populism means a politics of the people, juxtaposed against a politics of the elites. But, at least in the U.S., President Donald Trump’s ideology – which has little to do with traditional Republican conservatism – frames the axis of division not as the many versus the few, but as nationalists versus globalists.

News

March 22, 2017

U.S. Forces Ferry Syrian-Kurdish Fighters Behind IS Lines

By Philip Issa & Robert Burns | Associated Press

U.S. aircraft ferried Syrian Kurdish fighters and allied forces behind Islamic State lines on Wednesday to spearhead a major ground assault on a strategic town held by the extremist group outside its self-declared capital, Raqqa, the Pentagon said, marking the first time U.S. forces have provided airlift for local forces on a combat operation in Syria.

More from WPR: Trump’s Real Challenge in the Middle East: Don’t Follow Russia and Iran

Trump to Attend NATO Summit in May, White House Says

By David Nakamura | The Washington Post

The White House on Tuesday night confirmed that President Trump will attend a gathering of NATO leaders in Brussels in May, a move that could help reassure U.S. allies about his administration's commitment to Europe's security.

Mexico's government on Tuesday warned Mexican companies that it would not be in their best "interests" to participate in the construction of U.S. President Donald Trump's border wall, though there will be no legal restrictions or sanctions to stop them if they tried.

The United States military has begun formally investigating an American airstrike in Syria that officials said targeted dozens of Qaeda operatives at a meeting place that activists and local residents maintain was part of a religious complex where 49 civilians were killed.

Opinion

March 22, 2017

The Race to Raqqa Could Cost Trump Turkey

By David Kenner, Molly O'Toole | Foreign Policy

The anti-Islamic State fight could devolve into a war between the Kurds and Ankara and disrupt the plan to take back the terrorist group’s de facto capital.

The Americas

News

March 23, 2017

A spokesman for China's commerce ministry confirmed Thursday his government has banned imports of Brazilian beef. Brazil's agriculture minister said earlier China suspended imports after investigators accused Brazilian inspectors of taking bribes to overlook expired meat and chemicals.

Opinion

March 23, 2017

News

March 22, 2017

Mexico's government on Tuesday warned Mexican companies that it would not be in their best "interests" to participate in the construction of U.S. President Donald Trump's border wall, though there will be no legal restrictions or sanctions to stop them if they tried.

New Prime Minister Urges Haitians to Heal Deep Divisions

By David McFadden | Associated Press

Haiti's new prime minister on Tuesday urged this deeply polarized country to bridge divisions, and he vowed to bring steady advances even while acknowledging that the struggling nation has no shortage of accelerating problems.

Europe

News

March 23, 2017

The former Russian MP Denis Voronenkov has been shot and killed in Kiev. Police said an unidentified gunman had shot Voronenkov dead at the entrance of an upmarket hotel in the Ukrainian capital.

As the tricolor-draped coffin of former IRA commander turned peacemaker Martin McGuinness was carried to his Londonderry home this week, people across Northern Ireland's sectarian divide were nervously eyeing a new era of uncertainty.

Opinion

March 23, 2017

Nationalists and Globalists

By Anne-Marie Slaughter | Project Syndicate

Populism means a politics of the people, juxtaposed against a politics of the elites. But, at least in the U.S., President Donald Trump’s ideology – which has little to do with traditional Republican conservatism – frames the axis of division not as the many versus the few, but as nationalists versus globalists.

A Franco-German Bargain to Save Europe

By Philip Stephens | Financial Times (subscription required)

A restored relationship between Berlin and Paris would be an important source of confidence. It might also mark the beginning of a new “core Europe” with the will and capacity to deepen cooperation. Hard as it is to be optimistic about Europe, it is time to temper some of the pessimism.

EU Deeply Divided Over Western Sahara Policy

By Charlotte Bruneau | Al-Monitor

A European Court of Justice decision excluding Western Saharan exports from receiving preferential tariffs granted to Morocco has highlighted the need for the European Union to address the issue of who represents the people of Western Sahara.

News

March 22, 2017

Russia Strengthens Presence in Kurdish-Held Syria

By Erika Solomon | Financial Times (subscription required)

Russia is building up its presence in Kurdish-held areas of northern Syria in a move likely to alarm neighbouring Turkey. A Kurdish militia known as the YPG said Moscow had set up a base in the Afrin area to train the Kurdish forces and establish a point of direct contact.

Several hundred Bulgarian nationalists have blocked the three main checkpoints at the Bulgarian-Turkish border for a few hours Tuesday to prevent what they called "electoral tourism" by Bulgarian citizens living permanently in Turkey.

France’s Le Pen Focuses on Terrorism in Chad Leader Visit

By Madjiasra Nako & John Irish | Reuters

French far-right leader Marine Le Pen met Chad's President Idriss Deby on Tuesday to discuss the two allies' cooperation in the fight against Islamist militants in Africa. Le Pen, among the frontrunners in the French presidential election, arrived in Chad on Tuesday and is using the two-day visit to meet French troops stationed in Chad and to outline her policies for the continent.

Calls for Eurozone Chief to Quit for 'Liquor and Women' Quip

By Raf Casert & Barry Hatton | Associated Press

Portugal led calls on Wednesday for the head of the eurozone to resign for what many considered derogatory comments about southern debt-ridden nations spending foolishly before seeking outside help to emerge from the financial crisis.

Opinion

March 22, 2017

Keeping the Balkan Ghosts at Bay

By Carl Bildt | Project Syndicate

European leaders, having suddenly awoken to new realities in the Balkans, are calling for increased engagement in the region to maintain stability and push back against Russian influence. But it is now clear that the only way forward for the EU is to accelerate the remaining Balkan countries' integration into the bloc.

History’s Guide to Contested Liberalism

By A. Bradley Potter | War on the Rocks

Through a careful study of history, not as a toolbox of old approaches or as a mechanism for simple diagnostics, but as a means of refining our judgment and developing contingent generalizations about the world, wise policymakers may prepare themselves to discover sustainable and liberal alternatives to the powerful forces of populism, nationalism, and autocracy at work today.

News

March 21, 2017

Africa

News

March 23, 2017

Africa faces the world's largest humanitarian crisis since 1945, with more than 20 million people facing starvation, and any cut in funding to humanitarian agencies working in famine-affected areas will cause untold suffering, a spokesman for the World Food Program said Thursday, responding to questions about U.S. President Donald Trump's proposal to cut $10 billion in foreign aid.

More from WPR: What Does the Populist Wave Mean for Global Aid and Development?

Uganda is at a "breaking point" as almost 3,000 South Sudanese refugees pour into the country every day, the United Nations refugee chief said Thursday. The U.N. has called it the world's fastest-growing refugee crisis.

A former warlord and ex-vice-president of the Democratic Republic of the Congo has been sentenced by the International Criminal Court (ICC) to a year in jail and fined $320,000 for bribing witnesses during an earlier war crimes trial. Wednesday’s verdict and sentence are the first of their kind in the history of the ICC.

More from WPR: The ICC Is Flawed. Is It Still Africa’s Best Hope for Justice?

Tanzanian President John Magufuli yesterday witnessed the signing of three agreements between the governments of Tanzania and China to support the expansion of a police training institute in Kilimanjaro and the construction of a building for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and East African Cooperation.

Tunisian PM in Khartoum for Talks With Sudan Officials

By Mohammad al-Khatam | Anadolu Agency

Tunisian Prime Minister Yusuf al-Shahid arrived in Sudanese capital Khartoum on Wednesday for a two-day official visit. His visit is the first trip to Sudan by a Tunisian prime minister since former Tunisian President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali was toppled in 2011’s “Arab Spring” uprisings.

Opinion

March 23, 2017

News

March 22, 2017

African Governments Urged to Spend More on Clean Water

By Rodney Muhumuza | Associated Press

Nearly a third of people in sub-Saharan Africa do not have access to safe drinking water, the World Water Council said Wednesday, urging governments to contribute adequate amounts of their budgets toward projects aimed at making safe water widely available.

France’s Le Pen Focuses on Terrorism in Chad Leader Visit

By Madjiasra Nako & John Irish | Reuters

French far-right leader Marine Le Pen met Chad's President Idriss Deby on Tuesday to discuss the two allies' cooperation in the fight against Islamist militants in Africa. Le Pen, among the frontrunners in the French presidential election, arrived in Chad on Tuesday and is using the two-day visit to meet French troops stationed in Chad and to outline her policies for the continent.

UNHCR, the U.N. Refugee Agency, is concerned by continuing forced return of hundreds of refugees from Cameroon’s far north region to north-eastern Nigeria despite the recent signing of the tripartite agreement aimed at, among other things, ensuring the voluntary nature of returns.

Opinion

March 22, 2017

Cameroon Continues Its Oppression of English Speakers

By Denis Foretia | The Washington Post

What began as occasional protests in Cameroon by Anglophone lawyers and teachers’ trade unions in November 2016 has now transformed into full-scale civil disobedience. Cameroon’s English-speaking citizens constitute 20 percent of the total population. The oppressive response from the government has brought the country to a state of complete political paralysis.

Middle East & North Africa

News

March 23, 2017

Jihadists and other rebel groups made advances against the Syrian army north of Hama on Thursday, a war monitor said, part of their biggest offensive for months, underscoring the bleak prospects for peace talks which resume later in the day.

Tunisian PM in Khartoum for Talks With Sudan Officials

By Mohammad al-Khatam | Anadolu Agency

Tunisian Prime Minister Yusuf al-Shahid arrived in Sudanese capital Khartoum on Wednesday for a two-day official visit. His visit is the first trip to Sudan by a Tunisian prime minister since former Tunisian President Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali was toppled in 2011’s “Arab Spring” uprisings.

Opinion

March 23, 2017

EU Deeply Divided Over Western Sahara Policy

By Charlotte Bruneau | Al-Monitor

A European Court of Justice decision excluding Western Saharan exports from receiving preferential tariffs granted to Morocco has highlighted the need for the European Union to address the issue of who represents the people of Western Sahara.

Five Myths About Syrian Refugees

By Max Abrahms, Denis Sullivan, & Charles Simpson | Foreign Affairs

The Syrian refugee crisis is the worst human security disaster of the twenty-first century. Yet a lack of direct evidence from the field has spawned speculation, misinformation, and poorly informed policymaking.

News

March 22, 2017

U.S. Forces Ferry Syrian-Kurdish Fighters Behind IS Lines

By Philip Issa & Robert Burns | Associated Press

U.S. aircraft ferried Syrian Kurdish fighters and allied forces behind Islamic State lines on Wednesday to spearhead a major ground assault on a strategic town held by the extremist group outside its self-declared capital, Raqqa, the Pentagon said, marking the first time U.S. forces have provided airlift for local forces on a combat operation in Syria.

More from WPR: Trump’s Real Challenge in the Middle East: Don’t Follow Russia and Iran

Russia Strengthens Presence in Kurdish-Held Syria

By Erika Solomon | Financial Times (subscription required)

Russia is building up its presence in Kurdish-held areas of northern Syria in a move likely to alarm neighbouring Turkey. A Kurdish militia known as the YPG said Moscow had set up a base in the Afrin area to train the Kurdish forces and establish a point of direct contact.

The U.N. on Tuesday urged those attending this week’s Syria peace talks to engage “substantively and proactively.” The next round of the negotiations will be staged in Geneva on Thursday.

India Tries to Fix Iran Trade Payments as Trump Hardens Line

By Nidhi Verma & Manoj Kumar | Reuters

India is exploring setting up a new payments mechanism for trade with Iran, after its old sanctions workaround broke down, as state banks remain fearful of handling payments from Tehran in case the United States imposes a fresh financial embargo.

Opinion

March 22, 2017

The Race to Raqqa Could Cost Trump Turkey

By David Kenner, Molly O'Toole | Foreign Policy

The anti-Islamic State fight could devolve into a war between the Kurds and Ankara and disrupt the plan to take back the terrorist group’s de facto capital.

Asia-Pacific

News

March 23, 2017

For the fifth time in the two decades since this former British colony’s return to Chinese rule, Hong Kong’s next chief executive will be selected on Sunday by a committee stacked with supporters of the Chinese government rather than by a free election.

Taliban Forces Seize Strategic District in Embattled Helmand Province

By Pamela Constable & Sayed Salahuddin | The Washington Post

Taliban insurgents captured a strategic district in embattled Helmand Province Thursday, officials said, while Afghan troops were evacuated from the area and Air Force planes bombed military installations there to prevent the Taliban from using them.

Pakistan held a military parade on Thursday to mark its national day, with Chinese, Saudi and Turkish troops for the first time participating in the event in a show of deepening ties with the world's only declared Islamic nuclear power. Earlier, President Mamnoon Hussain told the audience that his country was ready for talks with India on all issues, including the disputed Kashmir.

More from WPR: What Will It Take To Get Troubled India-Pakistan Ties Back on Track?

Vietnam and Singapore have signed several business agreements as the island state seeks to boost investment and trade with the communist country during a visit by Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong.

A spokesman for China's commerce ministry confirmed Thursday his government has banned imports of Brazilian beef. Brazil's agriculture minister said earlier China suspended imports after investigators accused Brazilian inspectors of taking bribes to overlook expired meat and chemicals.

Tanzanian President John Magufuli yesterday witnessed the signing of three agreements between the governments of Tanzania and China to support the expansion of a police training institute in Kilimanjaro and the construction of a building for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and East African Cooperation.

Opinion

March 23, 2017

News

March 22, 2017

China is not building an environmental monitoring station on a disputed South China Sea shoal, the foreign ministry said Wednesday, apparently denying remarks made by a local official last week.

India Tries to Fix Iran Trade Payments as Trump Hardens Line

By Nidhi Verma & Manoj Kumar | Reuters

India is exploring setting up a new payments mechanism for trade with Iran, after its old sanctions workaround broke down, as state banks remain fearful of handling payments from Tehran in case the United States imposes a fresh financial embargo.

Opinion

March 22, 2017

The Sino-Korean Trade War Must End

By Lee Jong-Wha | Project Syndicate

Since South Korea decided to deploy a U.S. missile-defense system, China has been attempting to use economic pressure to compel the South to reverse course. But, as long as North Korea poses such an acute threat, China’s opposition to it is pointless – and highly destructive.

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