Media Roundup

United States

Top News

Hagel Said to Be Stepping Down as Defense Chief Under Pressure

By Helene Cooper | The New York Times

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is stepping down under pressure, the first cabinet-level casualty of the collapse of President Obama’s Democratic majority in the Senate and a beleaguered national security team that has struggled to stay ahead of an onslaught of global crises.

U.S., Iran May Extend Nuclear Talks

By Guy Taylor | The Washington Times

U.S. and Iranian officials appeared close on Sunday to extending the high-stakes talks over Iran's disputed nuclear program after failing to meet a self-imposed deadline for a deal that would open the program to close international scrutiny in exchange for a withdrawal of crippling Western sanctions on Tehran.

Opinion

When Is a War Over?

By Elizabeth D. Samet | The New York Times

What an Army major and Alexander the Great tell us about America’s 13 years in Afghanistan.

Washington’s Two Foreign Policies

By Edward Luce | Financial Times

By tradition Capitol Hill often plays bad cop to the White House’s good cop on the world stage. Congress threatens something bad – currency sanctions on China, say – that the administration then uses to wring concessions.

The Failed NSA Reform Bill Was a Sham Anyway

By Marcy Wheeler | Foreign Policy

"Data handshakes," call records, and the NSA's back door into telecom companies reveal that the Senate's plan to protect Americans' privacy would have done no such thing.

Latin America

Opinion

The Iran-Cuba-Venezuela Nexus

By Mary Anastasia O’Grady | The Washington Post

The West underestimates the growing threat from radical Islam in the Americas.

What “Free Trade” Has Done to Central America

By Manuel Perez-Rocha and Julia Paley | Foreign Policy in Focus

Warnings about the human and environmental costs of “free trade” went unheeded. Now the most vulnerable Central Americans are paying the price.

Europe

Top News

UK: 'Severe' Terror Threat Requires New Powers

By Jill Lawless | The Associated Press

Britain's interior minister said Monday that the country faces its greatest-ever threat from terrorism, as she announced measures to control suspects, strengthen online scrutiny and prevent insurance companies from paying terrorist ransoms.

Opinion

The Russian Rebel Spirit

By Alexei Bayer | The Moscow Times

Back in the Soviet era, American historian Richard Pipes wrote that the Russian people are both inherently anarchic and frightened of their own nature.

Off the Radar

3rd New Nuclear Missile Submarine Set to Join Russian Navy

The Moscow Times

Amid a buildup of Moscow’s naval power, the Russian Navy is set to commission its third brand new Borei class nuclear missile submarine, the K-551 Vladimir Monomakh, a senior Defense Ministry source was quoted as saying by the TASS news agency Friday.

Africa

Off the Radar

Zambia’s President Scott Suspended as Ruling Party Leader

By Chris Mfula | Reuters

Zambia’s ruling Patriotic Front (PF) said Friday it had suspended President Guy Scott as acting head of the party for “unconstitutional conduct,” in the latest twist of a bitter power struggle ahead of a January election.

Mali, Rebels Start Third Round of Peace Talks

By Reuters | defenceWeb

Mali began a third round of peace negotiations with mostly Tuareg rebel groups in Algiers on Thursday aimed at ending decades of uprisings in the north, with the government calling for a swift conclusion of a deal.

Cote d’Ivoire Soldiers End Protests After Government Concessions

By Reuters | defenceWeb

Disgruntled former rebels now serving in Cote d’Ivoire’s army have agreed to end a protest over back pay and overdue benefits, they said Thursday, following two days of talks with government ministers and a meeting with the president.

Previous Media Roundup coverage: Cote d’Ivoire Opens Talks With Disgruntled Soldiers Protesting Soldiers in Cote d’Ivoire Return to Barracks, Await Talks, Cote d’Ivoire Soldiers Protest Over Benefits, Bonuses

Middle East

Top News

Control of Syrian Oil Fuels War

By Sam Dagher | The Wall Street Journal

Impoverished families in northeast Syria operate thousands of primitive kilns to refine oil distributed by the warring sides to buy loyalty—or face the consequences.

Graft Hobbles Iraq’s Military in Fighting ISIS

By David D. Kirkpatrick | The New York Times

The Iraqi military and police forces had been so pillaged by their own leadership that they all but collapsed this spring in the face of the advancing Islamic State fighters.

Iraqi Troops Retake 2 Towns in Eastern Province

By Sameer N. Yacoub | The Associated Press

Iraqi troops backed by Shiite militiamen and Kurdish security forces recaptured two towns seized previously by militants in an eastern province, said Iraqi officials on Monday, a new victory for Iraqi security forces in their attempt to regain areas lost to the militants.

In Razing Homes, Israel Revives Tough Punishment

By Karin Laub | The Associated Press

In razing family homes of Palestinian attackers, Israel is reviving a draconian punishment it largely halted a decade ago as ineffective and counterproductive.

Opinion

Bahrain and the Death of the Myth of the Majority

By Salman Aldossary | Asharq Alawsat

Bahrainis have headed to the polls in large numbers for their country’s parliamentary elections, with the turnout exceeding 51 percent despite the calls for a boycott of the polls from the opposition, led by Al-Wefaq, the country’s main Shi’ite opposition group.

Off the Radar

Africa-Turkey Summit to Issue Five-Year Roadmap

World Bulletin

Leaders of African countries and Turkey met Friday in the seaside city of Malabo, the capital of Equatorial Guinea, to review the performance of the 1st Africa-Turkey partnership and to endorse priority area projects for the next five years.

Asia / Pacific

Top News

Abe’s Lead Wide Ahead of Japan Election

By Takashi Mochizuki | The Wall Street Journal

Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe heads into a national election campaign with a wide lead, despite shrinking popular support for his economic policies, newspaper polls show.

China Defends Land Reclamation in South China Sea

The Associated Press

Defying a U.S. call to halt the project, China defended its land reclamation in the disputed Spratly Islands in the South China Sea on Monday, saying the work is for public service use, although a London-based security group says the new island could host a military airfield to intimidate neighbors.

Off the Radar

Mongolia Gets New Prime Minister as Economy Slumps

Reuters

Mongolia’s parliament has appointed Chimed Saikhanbileg as prime minister, it said on Friday, more than two weeks after it ousted his predecessor for failing to get to grips with a slumping economy and foreign investment.

Indian Navy Warship Visiting Mozambique

defenceWeb

Fresh from participating in Exercise Ibsamar in South African waters, the Indian Naval Ship Teg is currently on a goodwill visit to Mozambique.

Top News

Hagel Said to Be Stepping Down as Defense Chief Under Pressure

By Helene Cooper | The New York Times

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel is stepping down under pressure, the first cabinet-level casualty of the collapse of President Obama’s Democratic majority in the Senate and a beleaguered national security team that has struggled to stay ahead of an onslaught of global crises.

U.S., Iran May Extend Nuclear Talks

By Guy Taylor | The Washington Times

U.S. and Iranian officials appeared close on Sunday to extending the high-stakes talks over Iran's disputed nuclear program after failing to meet a self-imposed deadline for a deal that would open the program to close international scrutiny in exchange for a withdrawal of crippling Western sanctions on Tehran.

Opinion

When Is a War Over?

By Elizabeth D. Samet | The New York Times

What an Army major and Alexander the Great tell us about America’s 13 years in Afghanistan.

Washington’s Two Foreign Policies

By Edward Luce | Financial Times

By tradition Capitol Hill often plays bad cop to the White House’s good cop on the world stage. Congress threatens something bad – currency sanctions on China, say – that the administration then uses to wring concessions.

The Failed NSA Reform Bill Was a Sham Anyway

By Marcy Wheeler | Foreign Policy

"Data handshakes," call records, and the NSA's back door into telecom companies reveal that the Senate's plan to protect Americans' privacy would have done no such thing.

Opinion

The Iran-Cuba-Venezuela Nexus

By Mary Anastasia O’Grady | The Washington Post

The West underestimates the growing threat from radical Islam in the Americas.

What “Free Trade” Has Done to Central America

By Manuel Perez-Rocha and Julia Paley | Foreign Policy in Focus

Warnings about the human and environmental costs of “free trade” went unheeded. Now the most vulnerable Central Americans are paying the price.

Top News

UK: 'Severe' Terror Threat Requires New Powers

By Jill Lawless | The Associated Press

Britain's interior minister said Monday that the country faces its greatest-ever threat from terrorism, as she announced measures to control suspects, strengthen online scrutiny and prevent insurance companies from paying terrorist ransoms.

Opinion

The Russian Rebel Spirit

By Alexei Bayer | The Moscow Times

Back in the Soviet era, American historian Richard Pipes wrote that the Russian people are both inherently anarchic and frightened of their own nature.

Off the Radar

3rd New Nuclear Missile Submarine Set to Join Russian Navy

The Moscow Times

Amid a buildup of Moscow’s naval power, the Russian Navy is set to commission its third brand new Borei class nuclear missile submarine, the K-551 Vladimir Monomakh, a senior Defense Ministry source was quoted as saying by the TASS news agency Friday.

Off the Radar

Zambia’s President Scott Suspended as Ruling Party Leader

By Chris Mfula | Reuters

Zambia’s ruling Patriotic Front (PF) said Friday it had suspended President Guy Scott as acting head of the party for “unconstitutional conduct,” in the latest twist of a bitter power struggle ahead of a January election.

Mali, Rebels Start Third Round of Peace Talks

By Reuters | defenceWeb

Mali began a third round of peace negotiations with mostly Tuareg rebel groups in Algiers on Thursday aimed at ending decades of uprisings in the north, with the government calling for a swift conclusion of a deal.

Cote d’Ivoire Soldiers End Protests After Government Concessions

By Reuters | defenceWeb

Disgruntled former rebels now serving in Cote d’Ivoire’s army have agreed to end a protest over back pay and overdue benefits, they said Thursday, following two days of talks with government ministers and a meeting with the president.

Previous Media Roundup coverage: Cote d’Ivoire Opens Talks With Disgruntled Soldiers Protesting Soldiers in Cote d’Ivoire Return to Barracks, Await Talks, Cote d’Ivoire Soldiers Protest Over Benefits, Bonuses

Top News

Control of Syrian Oil Fuels War

By Sam Dagher | The Wall Street Journal

Impoverished families in northeast Syria operate thousands of primitive kilns to refine oil distributed by the warring sides to buy loyalty—or face the consequences.

Graft Hobbles Iraq’s Military in Fighting ISIS

By David D. Kirkpatrick | The New York Times

The Iraqi military and police forces had been so pillaged by their own leadership that they all but collapsed this spring in the face of the advancing Islamic State fighters.

Iraqi Troops Retake 2 Towns in Eastern Province

By Sameer N. Yacoub | The Associated Press

Iraqi troops backed by Shiite militiamen and Kurdish security forces recaptured two towns seized previously by militants in an eastern province, said Iraqi officials on Monday, a new victory for Iraqi security forces in their attempt to regain areas lost to the militants.

In Razing Homes, Israel Revives Tough Punishment

By Karin Laub | The Associated Press

In razing family homes of Palestinian attackers, Israel is reviving a draconian punishment it largely halted a decade ago as ineffective and counterproductive.

Opinion

Bahrain and the Death of the Myth of the Majority

By Salman Aldossary | Asharq Alawsat

Bahrainis have headed to the polls in large numbers for their country’s parliamentary elections, with the turnout exceeding 51 percent despite the calls for a boycott of the polls from the opposition, led by Al-Wefaq, the country’s main Shi’ite opposition group.

Off the Radar

Africa-Turkey Summit to Issue Five-Year Roadmap

World Bulletin

Leaders of African countries and Turkey met Friday in the seaside city of Malabo, the capital of Equatorial Guinea, to review the performance of the 1st Africa-Turkey partnership and to endorse priority area projects for the next five years.

Top News

Abe’s Lead Wide Ahead of Japan Election

By Takashi Mochizuki | The Wall Street Journal

Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe heads into a national election campaign with a wide lead, despite shrinking popular support for his economic policies, newspaper polls show.

China Defends Land Reclamation in South China Sea

The Associated Press

Defying a U.S. call to halt the project, China defended its land reclamation in the disputed Spratly Islands in the South China Sea on Monday, saying the work is for public service use, although a London-based security group says the new island could host a military airfield to intimidate neighbors.

Off the Radar

Mongolia Gets New Prime Minister as Economy Slumps

Reuters

Mongolia’s parliament has appointed Chimed Saikhanbileg as prime minister, it said on Friday, more than two weeks after it ousted his predecessor for failing to get to grips with a slumping economy and foreign investment.

Indian Navy Warship Visiting Mozambique

defenceWeb

Fresh from participating in Exercise Ibsamar in South African waters, the Indian Naval Ship Teg is currently on a goodwill visit to Mozambique.