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United States

News

February 27, 2017

The White House will send federal departments a budget proposal on Monday containing the defense spending increase President Donald Trump promised, financed partly by cuts to the U.S. State Department, Environmental Protection Agency and other non-defense programs, two officials familiar with the proposal said.

U.S. President Donald Trump's pick for secretary of the Navy withdrew from consideration on Sunday, the second time a Trump nominee to lead one of the armed services bowed out because of government conflict-of-interest rules.

Opinion

February 27, 2017

The Immigration Debate We Need

By George Borjas | The New York Times

The first month of the Trump administration has already changed the direction of the immigration debate, with many more changes coming soon. So far, executive orders and deportations dominate the discussion. But the fight over how many refugees to admit or how best to vet those refugees obscures what the debate is really about.

Throwing Money at the Pentagon Won't Make Us Safer

By John Tierney | The National Interest

Even with the executive order, Mr. Trump’s proposal will never come to fruition without legislative funding. After decades of financial mismanagement, Congress has a responsibility to exercise its oversight authority by demanding full audit readiness and verifiable fiscal discipline before even considering a Pentagon funding boost.

The Americas

News

February 27, 2017

Opinion

February 27, 2017

Mexico’s Trade Reply to Trump

By Mary Anastasia O’Grady | The Wall Street Journal (subscription required)

Mexico's economy minister says fixes to NAFTA are possible but restoring tariffs is a nonstarter.

Europe

News

February 27, 2017

Opinion

February 27, 2017

The Threat of Threats

By Dominique Moisi | Project Syndicate

Not long ago, the EU was a model of reconciliation, peace, and prosperity; today, it is a model of fear – and it is scaring others. If Europeans cannot develop – with lucidity, firmness, and dedication – enlightened solutions to the threats they face, who can?

Africa

News

February 27, 2017

An estimated 5 million Somalis, out of population of 10 million, need humanitarian assistance, according to the U.N. humanitarian office. About 363,000 acutely malnourished children "need urgent treatment and nutrition support, including 71,000 who are severely malnourished," said the U.S. Agency for International Development's Famine Early Warning Systems Network.

Opinion

February 27, 2017

Middle East & North Africa

News

February 27, 2017

Turkey-Backed Syrian Rebels Clash With Army in North

By Tom Perry & Humeyra Pamuk | Reuters

Turkey-backed Syrian rebel groups clashed with government forces near a city in northern Syria that the rebels recently captured from Islamic State, sources on both sides said, the second such confrontation in the region this month. The fighting late on Sunday took place in an area where the sides are waging separate campaigns against Islamic State.

More from WPR: What Can Turkey’s Intervention Into Northern Syria Really Achieve?

Iraqi Forces Seize Mosul Bridge as Thousands of Civilians Flee

By Stephen Kalin & Isabel Coles | Reuters

Iraqi forces seized a damaged Mosul bridge on Monday which could link up their units on either side of the Tigris river, as thousands of civilians fled the fighting for Islamic State's remaining stronghold in the west of the city.

Israel carried out a series of airstrikes on militant sites across the Gaza Strip on Monday, wounding at least four people, officials said, following a rocket attack on southern Israel that caused no casualties.

U.S. Drone Strike in Syria Kills Top al-Qaida Leader, Jihadis Say

By Martin Chulov & Tom McCarthy | The Guardian

One of al-Qaida’s most senior leaders has been killed by a U.S. drone strike in north-west Syria, jihadi leaders have said. Abu al-Khayr al-Masri – who has been part of the global jihadi organization for three decades and was a son-in-law of its founder, Osama bin Laden – was killed on Sunday when a missile fired from a drone hit the small car in which he was travelling.

Opinion

February 27, 2017

After Defeating ISIS, the Past May Come to Haunt Mosul

By Seth J. Frantzman | The National Interest

Many questions remain about what post-ISIS Mosul will look like. Will it revert to its pre-2014 state, when it was the beating heart of the insurgency, first against U.S. forces after 2003 and then against the government of Nouri al-Maliki from 2009 as U.S. forces left? Or will ISIS be defeated, and its brutal reign become part of history?

Asia-Pacific

News

February 27, 2017

Opinion

February 27, 2017

The Afghan war, now in its sixteenth year, has arguably become one of the world's most consequential conflicts. The steady stream of news from Afghanistan is as relentless as it is depressing. More important, the eerie silence in Washington, DC to discuss the future course of Afghan conflict—and America’s role in it—is deafening.

United States

News

February 27, 2017

The White House will send federal departments a budget proposal on Monday containing the defense spending increase President Donald Trump promised, financed partly by cuts to the U.S. State Department, Environmental Protection Agency and other non-defense programs, two officials familiar with the proposal said.

U.S. President Donald Trump's pick for secretary of the Navy withdrew from consideration on Sunday, the second time a Trump nominee to lead one of the armed services bowed out because of government conflict-of-interest rules.

Opinion

February 27, 2017

The Immigration Debate We Need

By George Borjas | The New York Times

The first month of the Trump administration has already changed the direction of the immigration debate, with many more changes coming soon. So far, executive orders and deportations dominate the discussion. But the fight over how many refugees to admit or how best to vet those refugees obscures what the debate is really about.

Throwing Money at the Pentagon Won't Make Us Safer

By John Tierney | The National Interest

Even with the executive order, Mr. Trump’s proposal will never come to fruition without legislative funding. After decades of financial mismanagement, Congress has a responsibility to exercise its oversight authority by demanding full audit readiness and verifiable fiscal discipline before even considering a Pentagon funding boost.

The Afghan war, now in its sixteenth year, has arguably become one of the world's most consequential conflicts. The steady stream of news from Afghanistan is as relentless as it is depressing. More important, the eerie silence in Washington, DC to discuss the future course of Afghan conflict—and America’s role in it—is deafening.

The Americas

News

February 27, 2017

Opinion

February 27, 2017

Mexico’s Trade Reply to Trump

By Mary Anastasia O’Grady | The Wall Street Journal (subscription required)

Mexico's economy minister says fixes to NAFTA are possible but restoring tariffs is a nonstarter.

Europe

News

February 27, 2017

Opinion

February 27, 2017

The Threat of Threats

By Dominique Moisi | Project Syndicate

Not long ago, the EU was a model of reconciliation, peace, and prosperity; today, it is a model of fear – and it is scaring others. If Europeans cannot develop – with lucidity, firmness, and dedication – enlightened solutions to the threats they face, who can?

Africa

News

February 27, 2017

An estimated 5 million Somalis, out of population of 10 million, need humanitarian assistance, according to the U.N. humanitarian office. About 363,000 acutely malnourished children "need urgent treatment and nutrition support, including 71,000 who are severely malnourished," said the U.S. Agency for International Development's Famine Early Warning Systems Network.

Opinion

February 27, 2017

Middle East & North Africa

News

February 27, 2017

Turkey-Backed Syrian Rebels Clash With Army in North

By Tom Perry & Humeyra Pamuk | Reuters

Turkey-backed Syrian rebel groups clashed with government forces near a city in northern Syria that the rebels recently captured from Islamic State, sources on both sides said, the second such confrontation in the region this month. The fighting late on Sunday took place in an area where the sides are waging separate campaigns against Islamic State.

More from WPR: What Can Turkey’s Intervention Into Northern Syria Really Achieve?

Iraqi Forces Seize Mosul Bridge as Thousands of Civilians Flee

By Stephen Kalin & Isabel Coles | Reuters

Iraqi forces seized a damaged Mosul bridge on Monday which could link up their units on either side of the Tigris river, as thousands of civilians fled the fighting for Islamic State's remaining stronghold in the west of the city.

Israel carried out a series of airstrikes on militant sites across the Gaza Strip on Monday, wounding at least four people, officials said, following a rocket attack on southern Israel that caused no casualties.

U.S. Drone Strike in Syria Kills Top al-Qaida Leader, Jihadis Say

By Martin Chulov & Tom McCarthy | The Guardian

One of al-Qaida’s most senior leaders has been killed by a U.S. drone strike in north-west Syria, jihadi leaders have said. Abu al-Khayr al-Masri – who has been part of the global jihadi organization for three decades and was a son-in-law of its founder, Osama bin Laden – was killed on Sunday when a missile fired from a drone hit the small car in which he was travelling.

Opinion

February 27, 2017

After Defeating ISIS, the Past May Come to Haunt Mosul

By Seth J. Frantzman | The National Interest

Many questions remain about what post-ISIS Mosul will look like. Will it revert to its pre-2014 state, when it was the beating heart of the insurgency, first against U.S. forces after 2003 and then against the government of Nouri al-Maliki from 2009 as U.S. forces left? Or will ISIS be defeated, and its brutal reign become part of history?

Asia-Pacific

News

February 27, 2017

Opinion

February 27, 2017

The Afghan war, now in its sixteenth year, has arguably become one of the world's most consequential conflicts. The steady stream of news from Afghanistan is as relentless as it is depressing. More important, the eerie silence in Washington, DC to discuss the future course of Afghan conflict—and America’s role in it—is deafening.

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