Media Roundup

United States

Top News

Geopolitical Tremors: America, Nuclear Talks and the New Middle East

By Nicola Abé, Dieter Bednarz, Erich Follath and Holger Stark | Der Spiegel

The U.S. is rethinking its approach to the Middle East and has even found commonalities with erstwhile archenemy Iran. Meanwhile, relations with traditional American allies, such as Israel and Saudi Arabia, are cooling. A nuclear deal could further the shift.

A Day After Missing Deal Deadline, Iran Nuclear Talks Resume

By Matthew Lee and George Jahn | The Associated Press

Negotiations over Iran’s nuclear program resumed here Wednesday but were almost immediately beset by competing claims, just hours after diplomats abandoned a March 31 deadline to reach the outline of a deal and agreed to press on. And as the latest round hit the week mark, three of the six foreign ministers involved left the talks with prospects for agreement remaining uncertain.

Obama Removes Weapons Freeze Against Egypt

By Peter Baker | The New York Times

Seeking to repair relations with a longtime ally at a time of spreading war in the Middle East, President Obama on Tuesday lifted an arms freeze against Egypt that he had first imposed after the military overthrow of the country’s democratically elected government nearly two years ago.

Opinion

Deal or No Deal

By David Ignatius | The Washington Post

The Iran talks have still borne fruit.

Satrapy Fishing in the Yemen

By Clifford D. May | The Washington Times

Three years ago, film-goers were treated to “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen,” which critic Kenneth Turan called a “pleasant fantasy” about the Middle East. Today, of course, Yemen is the hub of a bloody conflict, one which President Obama persists in viewing with equal unreality.

Race in the Modern World

By Kwame Anthony Appiah | Foreign Affairs

Nineteenth-century intellectuals saw races as biological and political facts. Their twentieth-century successors rejected both propositions—but identities rooted in the reality or fantasy of shared ancestry remain central in politics, both within and between nations.

Off the Radar

U.S. Defense Chief to Visit South Korea Next Week

By Jun Ji-hye | The Korea Times

U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter plans to visit South Korea next week to meet with his counterpart Han Min-koo. He is also scheduled to pay a courtesy call on President Park Geun-hye.

The Americas

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Off the Radar

Europe

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Record Number of Migrants Expected to Drown in Mediterranean This Year

By Patrick Kingsley | The Guardian

A record number of migrants will drown in the Mediterranean this year if the current death rate remains unchecked, after 10 times as many migrants lost their lives during the first three months of 2015 as during the equivalent period in 2014.

Off the Radar

Africa

Top News

Buhari Wins and Praises Jonathan in Landmark Nigeria Poll

Al Jazeera

Nigerian election winner Muhammadu Buhari has congratulated outgoing President Goodluck Jonathan for peacefully relinquishing power, a day after becoming the first Nigerian politician to unseat a sitting leader at the ballot box.

Off the Radar

Middle East

Top News

Islamic State’s Apparent Expansion May Be Deceptive

By Laura King, Shashank Bengali and Alexandra Zavis | Los Angeles Times

Herve Gourdel loved nothing more than to explore rugged peaks, journeys that over the decades had taken him from his native France to Nepal, Jordan, Morocco—and finally to Algeria, where in September the 55-year-old mountaineer was abducted and beheaded.

35 Dead in Yemen After Airstrikes Hit Factory Vicinity

By Ahmed al-Haj | The Associated Press

Saudi-led warplanes bombed Shiite rebel positions in both north and south Yemen early on Wednesday, setting off explosions and drawing return fire from anti-aircraft guns. Airstrikes also hit a factory in a western port city and 35 workers died there, according to witnesses and officials.

Opinion

Israel’s Drive Toward Self-Destruction

By Dennis Ross, David Makovsky and Ghaith al-Omari | Politico Magazine

Netanyahu must offer up hope to Palestinians or face a revived de-legitimization movement.

Off the Radar

Qatar Ambassador Returns to Egypt After Rift Over Libya

The Associated Press

Egypt’s state news agency says Qatar has returned its ambassador to Cairo almost a month after recalling him in response to an Egyptian official accusing the tiny Gulf nation of supporting terrorism.

Asia / Pacific

Top News

In Afghan Province, Fighting Gets Bloodier

By Margherita Stancati | The Wall Street Journal

Amid a continuing offensive by Afghan troops against the Taliban in northern Helmand province, military and civilian casualties are mounting, and locals are skeptical that peace is anywhere in sight.

Opinion

The Trials of Asian Democracy

By Yuriko Koike | Project Syndicate

These are times of trial—literally in the courts—for a growing number of Asia’s democracies. The list of major national political leaders in the region who have faced, or are about to face, criminal charges has grown so extensive that it is plausible to wonder whether democracy itself can survive in a number of these countries.

Vietnam and Great Power Rivalries

By Nhina Le and Koh Swee Lean Collin | The Diplomat

Will Russian use of Vietnam’s Cam Ranh Bay derail improving Hanoi-Washington ties?

A Global Health Game Changer From China?

By Yanzhong Huang | Council on Foreign Relations

China’s advancement in the pharmaceutical sector has major implications for global health but it remains constrained by governance and other factors.

Off the Radar

Top News

Geopolitical Tremors: America, Nuclear Talks and the New Middle East

By Nicola Abé, Dieter Bednarz, Erich Follath and Holger Stark | Der Spiegel

The U.S. is rethinking its approach to the Middle East and has even found commonalities with erstwhile archenemy Iran. Meanwhile, relations with traditional American allies, such as Israel and Saudi Arabia, are cooling. A nuclear deal could further the shift.

A Day After Missing Deal Deadline, Iran Nuclear Talks Resume

By Matthew Lee and George Jahn | The Associated Press

Negotiations over Iran’s nuclear program resumed here Wednesday but were almost immediately beset by competing claims, just hours after diplomats abandoned a March 31 deadline to reach the outline of a deal and agreed to press on. And as the latest round hit the week mark, three of the six foreign ministers involved left the talks with prospects for agreement remaining uncertain.

Obama Removes Weapons Freeze Against Egypt

By Peter Baker | The New York Times

Seeking to repair relations with a longtime ally at a time of spreading war in the Middle East, President Obama on Tuesday lifted an arms freeze against Egypt that he had first imposed after the military overthrow of the country’s democratically elected government nearly two years ago.

Opinion

Deal or No Deal

By David Ignatius | The Washington Post

The Iran talks have still borne fruit.

Satrapy Fishing in the Yemen

By Clifford D. May | The Washington Times

Three years ago, film-goers were treated to “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen,” which critic Kenneth Turan called a “pleasant fantasy” about the Middle East. Today, of course, Yemen is the hub of a bloody conflict, one which President Obama persists in viewing with equal unreality.

Race in the Modern World

By Kwame Anthony Appiah | Foreign Affairs

Nineteenth-century intellectuals saw races as biological and political facts. Their twentieth-century successors rejected both propositions—but identities rooted in the reality or fantasy of shared ancestry remain central in politics, both within and between nations.

Off the Radar

U.S. Defense Chief to Visit South Korea Next Week

By Jun Ji-hye | The Korea Times

U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter plans to visit South Korea next week to meet with his counterpart Han Min-koo. He is also scheduled to pay a courtesy call on President Park Geun-hye.

Top News

Off the Radar

Top News

Record Number of Migrants Expected to Drown in Mediterranean This Year

By Patrick Kingsley | The Guardian

A record number of migrants will drown in the Mediterranean this year if the current death rate remains unchecked, after 10 times as many migrants lost their lives during the first three months of 2015 as during the equivalent period in 2014.

Off the Radar

Top News

Buhari Wins and Praises Jonathan in Landmark Nigeria Poll

Al Jazeera

Nigerian election winner Muhammadu Buhari has congratulated outgoing President Goodluck Jonathan for peacefully relinquishing power, a day after becoming the first Nigerian politician to unseat a sitting leader at the ballot box.

Off the Radar

Top News

Islamic State’s Apparent Expansion May Be Deceptive

By Laura King, Shashank Bengali and Alexandra Zavis | Los Angeles Times

Herve Gourdel loved nothing more than to explore rugged peaks, journeys that over the decades had taken him from his native France to Nepal, Jordan, Morocco—and finally to Algeria, where in September the 55-year-old mountaineer was abducted and beheaded.

35 Dead in Yemen After Airstrikes Hit Factory Vicinity

By Ahmed al-Haj | The Associated Press

Saudi-led warplanes bombed Shiite rebel positions in both north and south Yemen early on Wednesday, setting off explosions and drawing return fire from anti-aircraft guns. Airstrikes also hit a factory in a western port city and 35 workers died there, according to witnesses and officials.

Opinion

Israel’s Drive Toward Self-Destruction

By Dennis Ross, David Makovsky and Ghaith al-Omari | Politico Magazine

Netanyahu must offer up hope to Palestinians or face a revived de-legitimization movement.

Off the Radar

Qatar Ambassador Returns to Egypt After Rift Over Libya

The Associated Press

Egypt’s state news agency says Qatar has returned its ambassador to Cairo almost a month after recalling him in response to an Egyptian official accusing the tiny Gulf nation of supporting terrorism.

Top News

In Afghan Province, Fighting Gets Bloodier

By Margherita Stancati | The Wall Street Journal

Amid a continuing offensive by Afghan troops against the Taliban in northern Helmand province, military and civilian casualties are mounting, and locals are skeptical that peace is anywhere in sight.

Opinion

The Trials of Asian Democracy

By Yuriko Koike | Project Syndicate

These are times of trial—literally in the courts—for a growing number of Asia’s democracies. The list of major national political leaders in the region who have faced, or are about to face, criminal charges has grown so extensive that it is plausible to wonder whether democracy itself can survive in a number of these countries.

Vietnam and Great Power Rivalries

By Nhina Le and Koh Swee Lean Collin | The Diplomat

Will Russian use of Vietnam’s Cam Ranh Bay derail improving Hanoi-Washington ties?

A Global Health Game Changer From China?

By Yanzhong Huang | Council on Foreign Relations

China’s advancement in the pharmaceutical sector has major implications for global health but it remains constrained by governance and other factors.

Off the Radar