War and Conflict Articles

A Turkish member of the U.N. peacekeeping force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) stands in his sentry box at the entrance of the Turkish Engineer Construction Company stationed near the southern port city of Tyre, Nov. 16, 2006 (AP photo by Burhan Ozbilici).
Global Insider

Turkey Takes Pragmatic Approach to International Peacekeeping

By The Editors
, , Trend Lines

In November 2014, Turkey announced plans to send peacekeepers to participate in U.N.-backed missions in the Central African Republic and Mali. In an email interview, Nil S. Satana, assistant professor at Bilkent University in Ankara discussed Turkey’s contributions to international peacekeeping missions. more


Strategic Horizons

The Paris Attacks and the Logic of Insurgency

By Steven Metz
, , Column

To understand last week’s horrific terrorist attacks in Paris first requires understanding the core logic of insurgency. Because insurgents are weaker than the government, they need help from the other side, even if it is unintentional. Whoever planned the Paris attacks is counting on this. more

After the Torture Report: What’s Next for the CIA?

By Frederick P. Hitz
, , Briefing

As the new year opens, and the dust has begun to settle from the release of a report last month by the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence on the CIA’s use of torture in the war on terror, it is time to ask what changes, if any, the report’s revelations will bring about for the agency in the coming years. more

FATA: The Never-Ending War on Pakistan’s Periphery

By Asad Hashim
, , Feature

The recent attack on a school in Peshawar, and the Pakistani government’s response, sum up life in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA)—a frontier region on the edge of Pakistan that has been overtaken by militants, the military and the struggle to survive in the tiny space between them. more

Strategic Horizons

What Are the Real Lessons of the Afghanistan War?

By Steven Metz
, , Column

Whether accurate or not, the recent American declaration of victory in Afghanistan launched a scramble among national security experts to identify the strategic lessons of the war. The stakes of this debate are high, and it is vital to get them right. more

Global Insights

Russia’s New Military Doctrine Hypes NATO Threat

By Richard Weitz
, , Column

Last week, Russian President Vladimir Putin approved a revised national military doctrine that describes NATO as a major national security threat to Russia. But until Russia’s economy recovers, Moscow will struggle to achieve the capabilities required to implement its new agenda. more

Diplomatic Fallout

Lessons in Secret Diplomacy From the First Christmas

By Richard Gowan
, , Column

The Christmas story is full of joy and wonder, but it also includes a cautionary tale about a diplomatic blunder. The three wise men give away key intelligence to King Herod, allowing him to seize the initiative and massacre innocents. Their failure offers useful lessons for the United States in 2014. more

Strategic Horizons

The Defeat of the Islamic State Would Not End the Violence In Iraq

By Steven Metz
, , Column

After months of military gains by the so-called Islamic State (IS) in Iraq, there is some hope that the tide is turning. Now is the time to begin discussing what comes next when—or if—IS is defeated militarily. Unfortunately, Washington seems to be making dangerous assumptions about Baghdad’s ability to secure the peace. more

Strategic Horizons

To Create Order, the U.S. Needs a Strategic Vision

By Steven Metz
, , Column

America’s global strategy once coherently linked U.S. actions in different places and on different issues. Today it does not, instead treating each security challenge in isolation. The reason for this incoherence is clear: The United States has no unifying strategic vision. more