Defense and Security Articles

U.S. door gunners in H-21 Shawnee gunships look for a suspected Viet Cong guerrilla who ran to a foxhole from the sampan on the Mekong Delta river bank, Jan. 17, 1964 (AP photo by Horst Faas).
Strategic Horizons

For Hint of Iraq’s Future, Take Another Look at Vietnam War

By Steven Metz
, , Column

Although it was common to hear ominous warnings of “another Vietnam” as Iraq devolved into insurgency in 2004, many soon concluded that the Vietnam analogy did not apply to Iraq. But Iraq’s unraveling over the past year suggests the Vietnam conflict may provide indications of Iraq’s future after all. more


Global Insider

Djibouti Cultivating Diverse Economic, Military Partnerships

By The Editors
, , Trend Lines

China is in negotiations with Djibouti to open a military base in the country, adding to its current roster of French, U.S., Japanese and EU military facilities. In an interview, David Styan, lecturer in politics at Birkbeck College, University of London, discussed Djibouti’s foreign relations. more

Diplomatic Fallout

Can Putin Rebrand Russia as Stabilizing Force in Ukraine, Syria?

By Richard Gowan
, , Column

Vladimir Putin looked a little isolated on May 9, when world leaders largely stayed away from Moscow’s parade commemorating the end of World War II. But since then, Angela Merkel has gone to Moscow for talks, and John Kerry has visited Putin in Sochi. Putin may not be globally popular, but he is no pariah. more

Strategic Horizons

Robotic Revolution Opens New Front for Homeland Security

By Steven Metz
, , Column

The growing interest in robots among the world’s militaries has potential dangers, among them that autonomous “killer robots” might someday be used against humans. While this certainly deserves concern and attention, there is an even greater risk: the adoption of robots by “dark organizations.” more

Global Insider

Senegal Troop Deployment to Saudi Arabia Symbol of Close Ties

By The Editors
, , Trend Lines

Earlier this month, Senegal’s foreign minister announced that the country was sending 2,100 troops to Saudi Arabia to participate in the coalition against Houthi rebels in Yemen. In an interview, Alex Thurston, a visiting associate professor at Georgetown University, discussed Senegal-Saudi ties. more

World Citizen

Camp David Summit Is U.S. Debut for Rising Saudi Prince

By Frida Ghitis
, , Column

Among the many challenges facing President Barack Obama and U.S. officials meeting with Gulf Arab leaders this week, one has abruptly climbed to near the top of the agenda: taking the measure of the rising star of the Saudi firmament, King Salman’s son Prince Mohammed bin Salman. more

Global Dispatches Podcast

Burundi on a Knife’s Edge

By The Editors
, , Trend Lines

Burundi’s political crisis deepened Wednesday with a general launching a coup attempt against President Pierre Nkurunziza. World Politics Review partnered with the Global Dispatches podcast to produce an interview with WPR contributor Jonathan W. Rosen on the situation in the East African country.

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Defining Defense: Japan’s Military Identity Crisis

By Sheila A. Smith
, , Feature

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe has implemented a rapid succession of security reforms meant to respond to Northeast Asia’s changing threat environment. Yet the Japanese public remains skeptical and cautious when it comes to lifting the post-WWII constitution’s limits on the use of the military. more

Global Insider

India Rafale Deal Part of Needed Air Force Modernization

By The Editors
, , Trend Lines

Last month, India announced plans to purchase 36 Rafale fighter jets from France, though a final deal has yet to be signed. In an interview, Iskander Rehman, a nonresident fellow in the South Asia Program at the Atlantic Council, discussed India’s air force. more

Diplomatic Fallout

Marginalized U.N. Fights for Humanitarian Agenda in Middle East

By Richard Gowan
, , Column

Last week, the United Nations was thrust back into the center of crisis management in the Arab world. But while a new round of Syria talks and calls for greater involvement in Libya and Yemen imply the U.N. is still a central player in Middle East crises, the reality may turn out to prove the reverse. more

Strategic Horizons

Will the U.S. Military Continue to Win the Innovation Contest?

By Steven Metz
, , Column

Strategic superiority is not simply a matter of who has the most troops and weapons. It is also about who wins the ongoing contest of military innovation to possess tomorrow’s winning ideas. A few decades ago the U.S. was the undisputed master of this contest. Today, the playing field has leveled. more