Defense and Security Articles

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko meets with fired Dnipropetrovsk Gov. Ihor Kolomoysky, Kiev, Ukraine, March 25, 2015 (AP photo by Mikhail Palinchak).

Opposition Murders and Infighting Among Oligarchs Plague Ukraine

By David Klion
, , Trend Lines

Several pro-Russian opposition figures in Ukraine have been killed in recent months, as Kiev struggles to reform its economy and rein in corruption. Even as the cease-fire with Russia in the east remains shaky, Ukraine’s deep internal crisis threatens the country’s Western aspirations. more


Strategic Horizons

Iran Deal Opponents Have Forgotten the Logic of Arms Control

By Steven Metz
, , Column

Last week, U.S. President Barack Obama unveiled a diplomatic framework designed to prevent Iran from obtaining nuclear weapons. But after several decades with no major arms control agreements, the American public and its elected representatives no longer understand the complex logic of arms control. more

Obama’s Welcome Cyber Sanctions Plan Is Worth Expanding

By Eric Sterner
, , Briefing

On April 1, U.S. President Barack Obama signed an executive order to apply financial sanctions on hackers and companies overseas that benefit from cyberspying. It’s one brick in the foundation of deterrence in cyberspace, but the administration should consider ways to expand its reach through international partnerships. more

Hybrid Power: The Limits of Russia’s Military Resurgence

By Richard Weitz
, , Feature

Despite the remarkable recovery of its military-industrial complex in the past decade, Russia remains a regional military power with limited global power-projection capabilities. Recognizing the strengths and weaknesses of the Russian defense sector is crucial for assessing a potential Russian military threat. more

Global Insider

Though Greatly Weakened, Philippine Communist Insurgency Holds Steady

By The Editors
, , Trend Lines

In late February, communist rebels killed five Philippine soldiers in an ambush in a northern province. In an interview, Patricio Abinales, a professor of Asian studies at the School of Pacific and Asian Studies at the University of Hawaii-Manoa, discussed the Philippine communist insurgency. more

Strategic Horizons

Hard Choices Await Next U.S. President on Middle East

By Steven Metz
, , Column

In January 2017, a new U.S. president will move into the White House. He or she will immediately instruct the National Security Council to assess American national security strategy and provide policy options. No assessment will be more complex and important than the one dealing with the Middle East. more

In Context

The Road to Iran’s Agreement on a Framework Nuclear Deal

By The Editors
, , Trend Lines

With Thursday’s news that Iran and six world powers agreed on a framework deal to limit Iran’s nuclear program and prevent it from developing a nuclear weapon, WPR is making background reading available for free. The articles cover topics from leaps of faith in the talks to the U.S.-Israel split on Iran. more

Saudi Arabia Risks Quagmire in Yemen Campaign

By Peter Salisbury
, , Briefing

Despite almost a weeklong Saudi-led air campaign in Yemen to dislodge them, Houthi rebels have continued to push on into the south of the country. In the event of a ground invasion, the Saudis could find themselves facing the same kind of challenges the U.S. faced in 2003 after invading Iraq. more

Diplomatic Fallout

Nigeria, Yemen Wars Mark New Era of Ad Hoc Crisis Management

By Richard Gowan
, , Column

War is back in fashion. Across northern and western Africa and in the Middle East, governments are resorting to force to counter regional threats. This proliferation of regional military actions potentially signals a trend toward an increasing fragmentation of international crisis management. more